Preview: Ager-Ellingsen - Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Vehicles

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Life cycle assessment of electric vehicles Linda Ager-Wick Ellingsen Anders Hammer Strømman linda.e.llingsen@ntnu.no Life cycle assessment (LCA) Energy Materials Transport Manufacture & assembly Extraction & processing Emissions Use Waste products Recycling 2 The ReCiPe characterization method 3 Life cycle assessment of vehicles Complete life cycle Vehicle life cycle Vehicle production • Extraction and processing • Component manufacture and assembly Energy value chain Energy extraction Vehicle operation Energy distribution Energy conversion • Energy use • Maintenance End-of-life vehicle • Recycling/recovery • Waste management 4 We have good knowledge of the environmental impacts of conventional vehicles 5 Impact potentials Stressors Example of typical LCA results: Mercedes A class 6 DaimlerChrysler AG, Mercedes Car Group GHGs over the whole life cycle - high end of the range as of 2010 References: Daimler AG (2009,

2009, 2012), Volkswagen AG (2010, 2012) 7 GHGs over the whole life cycle - low end of the range as of 2010 References: Daimler AG (2009, 2010, 2012,2013,2014), Volkswagen AG (2010, 2012,2013,2014) 8 GHGs over the whole life cycle - low end of the range as of 2014 References: Daimler AG (2009, 2010, 2012,2013,2014), Volkswagen AG (2010, 2012,2013,2014) 9 Car size, fuel type, model year, and horsepower matter 3x References: Daimler AG (2009, 2010, 2012,2013,2014), Volkswagen AG (2010, 2012,2013,2014) 10 Can electric vehicles get us below the fossil envelope? References: Daimler AG (2009, 2009, 2012,2013,2014), Volkswagen AG (2010, 2012,2013,2014) 11 Zero emission vehicle? 12 BEVs have indirect operational emissions associated with the energy value chain 13 NTNU’s latest LCA study on battery electric vehicles published in 2016 14 Ellingsen et al. (2016) Size selection based on commercially available BEVs 250 A - segment B - segment C -

segment D - segment E - segment F - segment NEDC energy requirement (Wh/km) 200 150 100 mini car 50 medium car large car luxury car 0 800 900 1000 1100 1200 1300 1400 1500 1600 1700 Vehicle curb weight (kg) 1800 1900 2000 2100 2200 15 Electric vehicle parameters Segment Curb weight (kg) Battery size (kWh) Driving range (km) EV energy consumption (Wh/km) A - mini car 1100 17.7 133 146 C - medium car D - large car F - luxury car 1500 1750 2100 26.6 42.1 59.9 171 249 317 170 185 207 16 Production inventories 17 Use phase assumptions • Average European electricity mix (521 g CO2/kWh at plug, 462 g CO2/kWh at plant) • 12 years and a yearly mileage of 15,000 km, resulting in a total mileage of 180,000 km 18 End-of-life treatment 19 Conventional vehicles  Production and use phase from LCA reports  End-of-life inventory from Hawkins et al. 2012 20 Results 21 50 F 45 40 Fossil envelope -average new ICEVs as of

2015 D 35 Emission (ton CO2-eq) C 30 A 25 20 15 10 5 0 Driving distance (km) 22 Ellingsen et al. 2016 50 F 45 40 Fossil envelope -average ICEVs D 35 Emission (ton CO2-eq) C 30 A 25 20 15 10 5 0 Driving distance (km) A - mini car Ellingsen et al. 2016 C - medium car D - large car F - luxury car 23 Sensitivity analysis 24 Sensitivity analysis - coal World average coal (1029 g CO2-eq/kWh) 25 Ellingsen et al. 2016 Sensitivity analysis – natural gas World average natural gas (595 g CO2-eq/kWh) 26 Ellingsen et al. 2016 Sensitivity analysis – wind Wind (21 g CO2-eq/kWh) 27 Ellingsen et al. 2016 Sensitivity analysis – all wind Wind in all value chains (17 g CO2-eq/kWh) 28 Ellingsen et al. 2016 Differences in emissions due to size decrease with lower carbon intensity 29 Ellingsen et al. 2016 Questions? linda.e.llingsen@ntnu.no 30 NTNU Publications on e-mobility October 2012 November 2013 May 2016 December 2016 Ellingsen. L.

A-W., Hung, R. H., & Strømman, A. H. Identifying key assumptions and differences in life cycle assessment studies of lithium-ion traction batteries (In review 2017). Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment. Ellingsen. L. A-W., Majeau-Bettez, M., & Strømman, A. H. (2015). Comment on “The significance of Li-ion batteries in electric vehicle life-cycle energy and emissions and recyclings role in its reduction” in Energy & Environmental Science. The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment. Singh, B., Ellingsen. L. A-W., & Strømman, A. H. (2015). Pathways for GHG emission reduction in Norwegian road transport sector: Perspective on consumption of passenger car transport and electricity mix. Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment. Singh, B., Guest, G., Bright, R. M., & Strømman, A. H. (2014) Life Cycle Assessment of Electric and Fuel Cell Vehicle Transport Based on Forest Biomass. The International Journal of Life Cycle

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Assessment. Singh, B., & Strømman, A. H. (2013). Environmental assessment of electrification of road transport in Norway: Scenarios and impacts. Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment. Hawkins, T. R., Gausen, O. M., & Strømman, A. H. (2012). Environmental impacts of hybrid and electric vehicles—a review. The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment. Majeau-Bettez, M., Hawkings, T., & Strømman, A. H. (2011) Life Cycle Environmental Assessment of Lithium-ion and Nickel Metal Hydride 31 Batteries for Plug-in Hybrid and Battery Electric Vehicles