Preview: Contraception for Clients with HIV Curriculum, Facilitator Manual

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Contraception for Clients with HIV Curriculum Facilitator Manual Appendix: References for Training Presentations References for Training Presentations Presentation 1: HIV/AIDS Epidemic Disproportionately Affects Women 1. Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). 2006 Report on the Global AIDS Epidemic. (Geneva and New York: UNAIDS, 2006a) page 8. 2. Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), World Health Organization (WHO). AIDS Epidemic Update, December 2007. (Geneva: UNAIDS and WHO, 2007) page 8. 3. UNAIDS, 2006a. 4. Centro de Estudios Sociales y Demográficos (CESDEM); Secretaría de Estado de Salud Pública y Asistencia Social (SESPAS); Comisión Ejecutiva para la Reforma del Sector Salud (CERSS); Consejo Presidencial del SIDA (COPRESIDA); Agencia de los Estados Unidos para el Desarrollo Internacional (USAID); Banco Mundial/CERSS; Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo/CERSS; Programa MEASURE DHS+/ORC Macro. Encuesta Demográfica y de Salud (ENDESA) 2002.

Calverton, MD: CESDEM and ORC Macro, 2003. 5. Institut National de la Statistique (INS), ORC Macro. Enquête Démographique et de Santé du Cameroun 2004. Calverton, MD: INS and ORC Macro, 2004. 6. Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS) [Kenya], Ministry of Health (MOH) [Kenya], ORC Macro. Kenya Demographic and Health Survey 2003. Calverton, MD: CBS, MOH, and ORC Macro, 2004. 7. Central Statistical Office [Zambia], Central Board of Health [Zambia], ORC Macro. Zambia Demographic and Health Survey 2001-2002. Calverton, MD: Central Statistical Office, Central Board of Health, and ORC Macro, 2003. 8. CBS. 9. Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)/Inter-Agency Task Team on Gender and HIV/AIDS. Fact Sheet #8: HIV/AIDS, Gender and the Prevention of Motherto-Child Transmission (PMTCT). Resource Pack on Gender HIV/AIDS. New York: UNAIDS, 2006b. 10. UNAIDS, 2006a, pages 17-18. 11. UNAIDS, WHO, 2007, page 1. 12. United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF). The State of the World’s

Children 2007: Women and Children – The Double Dividend of Gender Equality. (New York: UNICEF, 2006) page 117. 13. United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF). Africa’s Orphaned and Vulnerable Generations: Children Affected by AIDS. New York: UNICEF, 2006. 14. Gregson S, Nyamukapa C, Garnett G, et al. HIV infection and reproductive health in teenage women orphaned and made vulnerable by AIDS in Zimbabwe. AIDS Care 2005;17(7):785-94. 15. Birdthistle I, Glynn JR, Floyd S, et al. From affected to infected? Understanding the sexual health risks to adolescent girls affected by AIDS in urban Zimbabwe. Poster presentation at Zimbabwe AIDS conference, September 2004. Presentation 2: Women Are More Vulnerable to HIV 1. Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS/The Global Coalition on Women and AIDS (UNAIDS). Keeping the Promise: An Agenda for Action on Women and AIDS. New York: UNAIDS, 2006. 2. Moss GB, Clemetson D, D’Costa L, et al. Association of cervical ectopy with heterosexual

transmission of human immunodeficiency virus: results of a study of couples in Nairobi, Kenya. J Infect Dis 1991;164(3):588-91. 3. United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). State of World Population 2005: The Promise of Equality. New York: UNFPA, 2005. Presentation References: Contraception for Clients with HIV Curriculum page 1 Presentation 3: ARV Therapy Basics in the Context of Family Planning 1. World Health Organization (WHO). Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV Infection in Adults and Adolescents: Recommendations for a Public Health Approach. 2006 Revision. Geneva: WHO, 2006. 2. Dabis F, Leroy V, Castetbon K, et al. Preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 in Africa in the year 2000. AIDS 2000;14(8):1017-26. 3. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Updated U.S. public health service guidelines for the management of occupational exposures to HIV and recommendations for postexposure prophylaxis. MMWR 2005;54(RR9). 4. Shelton JD, Peterson EA. The imperative

for family planning in ART therapy in Africa. Lancet 2004;364(9449):1916-18. 5. Powderly WG. Long-term exposure to lifelong therapies. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 2002;29(Suppl 1):S28-S40. 6. World Health Organization (WHO). Scaling Up Antiretroviral Therapy in ResourceLimited Settings: Treatment Guidelines for a Public Health Approach. 2003 Revision. Geneva: WHO, 2004. Presentation 4: Role of Family Planning in Alleviating the Burden of HIV 1. World Health Organization (WHO). Strategic Approaches to the Prevention of HIV Infection in Infants: Report of a WHO Meeting. Presentation at Morges, Switzerland, March 20–22, 2002. 2. U.S. Agency for International Development/Bureau for Global Health (USAID). Adding Family Planning to PMTCT Sites Increases the Benefits of PMTCT. Washington, DC: USAID, 2003. 3. Population Reference Bureau. Datafinder. Indicator: contraceptive use among married women, modern methods. Available: www.prb.org. 4. Population Reference Bureau. Datafinder. Indicator:

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unmet need for family planning. Available: www.prb.org. 5. Ross JA, Winfrey WL. Unmet need for contraception in the developing world and the former Soviet Union: an updated estimate. Int Fam Plann Perspect 2002;28(3):138-43. Presentation 5: Integrated Services Meet the Needs of Clients with HIV Family Health International. Integrating services. Network 2004;23(3). Full text available on this CD. Presentation 6: Reproductive Health Rights of Individuals with HIV 1. World Health Organization (WHO), United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). Sexual and Reproductive Health of Women Living with HIV/AIDS: Guidelines on Care, Treatment and Support for Women Living with HIV/AIDS and Their Children in Resource-Constrained Settings. (Geneva: WHO and UNFPA, 2006) page 5-6. 2. Pariani S, Heer DM, Van Arsdol MD Jr. Does choice make a difference to contraceptive use? Evidence from East Java. Stud Fam Plann 1991;22(6):384-90. 3. Huezo C, Malhotra U. Choice and Use – Continuation of Methods of

Contraception: A Multicentre Study. London: International Planned Parenthood Federation, 1993. 4. United Nations Population Division/Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population, Development and HIV/AIDS with Particular Emphasis on Poverty: the Concise Report. (New York: United Nations, 2005) page 25. Presentation 7: Reproductive Choices and Decisions for Clients with HIV 1. Saada M, Le Chenadec J, Berrebi A, et al. Pregnancy and progression to AIDS: results of the French prospective cohorts. SEROGEST and SEROCO Study Groups. AIDS 2000;14(15):2355-60. 2. Tai JH, Udoji MA, Barkanic G, et al. Pregnancy and HIV disease progression during the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. J Infect Dis 2007;196(7):1044-52. Presentation References: Contraception for Clients with HIV Curriculum page 2 3. Brocklehurst P, French R. The association between maternal HIV infection and perinatal outcome: a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis. BJOG

1998;105(8):836-48. 4. Preble EA, Huber D, Piwoz EG. Family Planning and the Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV: Technical and Programmatic Issues. Arlington, VA: Advance Africa, 2003. 5. Chen JL, Philips KA, Kanouse DE, et al. Fertility desires and intentions of HIV-positive men and women. Fam Plann Perspect 2001;33(4):144-52. 6. King R, Estey J, Allen S, et al. A family planning intervention to reduce vertical transmission of HIV in Rwanda. AIDS 1995;9(Suppl. 1):S45-S51. 7. Cates W. Use of contraception by HIV-infected women. IPPF Med Bull 2001:35(1):1-2. Presentation 8: Contraceptive Options for Women and Couples with HIV 1. World Health Organization/Department of Reproductive Health and Research (WHO), Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health/Center for Communication Programs/INFO Project (CCP). Family Planning: A Global Handbook for Providers. Baltimore, MD and Geneva: CCP and WHO, 2007. 2. WHO, 2007. 3. Steiner MJ, Dalebout S, Condon S, et al. Understanding

risk: a randomized controlled trial of communicating contraceptive effectiveness. Obstet Gynecol 2003;102(4):709-17. 4. Steiner MJ, Trussell J, Mehta N, et al. Communicating contraceptive effectiveness: a randomized controlled trial to inform a World Health Organization family planning handbook. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2006;195(1):85-91. 5. World Health Organization (WHO). Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use. Third Edition. Geneva: WHO, 2004; updated 2008. 6. WHO, 2004; updated 2008. 7. WHO, 2004; updated 2008. 8. WHO, 2004; updated 2008. Presentation 9: Condoms 1. Hatcher RA, Trussell J, Stewart FH, et al. Contraceptive Technology. Nineteenth Revised Edition. New York: Ardent Media, Inc., 2007. 2. Weller S, Davis K. Condom effectiveness in reducing heterosexual HIV transmission. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2002;(1):CD003255. 3. Deschamps M-M, Pape JW, Hafner A, et al. Heterosexual transmission of HIV in Haiti. Ann Inter Med 1996;125:324-30. 4. Hatcher. 5. World Health

Organization (WHO). Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use. Third Edition. Geneva: WHO, 2004; updated 2008. 6. Hatcher. 7. Wilkinson D, Ramjee G, Tholandi M, et al. Nonoxynol-9 for preventing vaginal acquisition of HIV infection by women from men. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2002;(4):CD003936. 8. Wilkinson. 9. World Health Organization (WHO), Contraceptive Research and Development Project (CONRAD). Safety of Nonoxynol-9 When Used for Contraception: Report from WHO/CONRAD Technical Consultation, October 2001. Geneva: WHO and CONRAD, 2002. 10. Van Damme L, Ramjee G, Alary M, et al. Effectiveness of COL-1492, a nonoxynol-9 vaginal gel, on HIV-1 transmission in female sex workers: a randomised controlled trial. Lancet 2002;360(9338):971-77. 11. Hatcher. Presentation References: Contraception for Clients with HIV Curriculum page 3 12. Moench TR, Chipato T, Padian NS. Preventing disease by protecting the cervix: the unexplored promise of internal vaginal barrier devices. AIDS

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2001;15(13):1595-1602. 13. Hu J, Gardner MB, Miller CJ. Simian immunodeficiency virus rapidly penetrates the cervicovaginal mucosa after intravaginal inoculation and infects intraepithelial dendritic cells. J Virol 2000;74(13):6087-95. 14. Padian N, van der Straten A, Ramjee G, et al. Diaphragm and lubricant gel for prevention of HIV acquisition in southern African women: a randomised controlled trial. Lancet 2007;370(9583):251-61. 15. WHO, 2004; updated 2008. 16. Gottlieb G, Nickle D, Jensen M, et al. HIV-1 superinfection in a rapid disease progressor: rapid replacement of the initial strain with the superinfecting virus by natural selection. Eleventh Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, San Francisco, CA, February 8-11, 2004. Presentation 10: Dual Protection = prevent pregnancy + avoid STI/HIV 1. World Health Organization (WHO), Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health/ Center for Communication Programs/INFO Project (CCP). Decision-Making Tool for Family

Planning Clients and Providers. Baltimore, MD and Geneva: CCP and WHO, 2005. 2. Diaz T, Schable B, Chu SY. Relationship between use of condoms and other forms of contraception among human immunodeficiency virus-infected women. Obstet Gynecol 1995;86(2):277-82. Presentation 11: Hormonal Contraceptives – Considerations for Women with HIV and AIDS 1. Leitz G, Mildvan D, McDonough M, et al. Nevirapine (VIRAMUNE, NCP) and ethinyl estradiol/norethindrone (ORTHO-NOVUM 1/35 [21 pack] EE/NET) interaction study in HIV-1 infected women. 7th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. San Francisco, CA, January 30-February 2, 2000. 2. Piscitelli S, Flexner C, Minor J, et al. Drug interactions in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. Clin Infect Dis 1996;23(4):685-93. 3. World Health Organization (WHO). Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use. Third Edition. Geneva: WHO, 2004. 4. Ouellet D, Hsu A, Qian J, et al. Effect of ritonavir on the pharmacokinetics of

ethinyl oestradiol in healthy female volunteers. Br J Clin Pharmacol 1998;46(2):111-16. 5. University of Liverpool. Drug Interaction Charts. Available: http://www.hivdruginteractions.org. Maintained by the University of Liverpool and eMED-MEDIA, last updated August 27, 2008. 6. WHO, 2004. 7. Cohn SE, Watts D, Lertora J, et al. An open-label, non-randomised study of the effect of depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate on the pharmacokinetics of selected protease inhibitors and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors therapies among HIVinfected women. 12th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, Boston, February 2005, abstract 82. 8. Lavreys L, Chohan V, Overbaugh J, et al. Hormonal contraception and risk of cervical infections among HIV-1 seropositive Kenyan women. AIDS 2004;18(16):2179-84. 9. Wang CC, Kreiss JK, Reilly M. Risk of HIV infection in oral contraceptive pill users: a meta-analysis. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 1999;21(1):51-58. 10. Wang CC, McClelland RS,

Overbaugh J, et al. The effect of hormonal contraception on genital tract shedding of HIV-1. AIDS 2004;18(2):205-9. 11. John GC, Nduati RW, Mbori-Ngacha DA, et al. Correlates of mother-to-child human immuno-deficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission: association with maternal plasma HIV-1 RNA load, genital HIV-1 DNA shedding, and breast infections. J Infect Dis 2001;183(2):206-12. Presentation References: Contraception for Clients with HIV Curriculum page 4 12. McClelland RS, Wang CC, Mandaliya K, et al. Treatment of cervicitis is associated with decreased cervical shedding of HIV-1. AIDS 2001;15(1):105-10. 13. Ghys PD, Fransen K, Diallo MO, et al. The associations between cervicovaginal HIV shedding, sexually transmitted diseases and immunosuppression in female sex workers in Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire. AIDS 1997;11(12):F85-93. 14. Lavreys L, Baeten JM, Kreiss JK, et al. Injectable contraceptive use and genital ulcer disease during the early phase of HIV-1 infection increase

plasma virus load in women. J Infect Dis 2004;189(2):303-11. 15. Sagar M, Lavreys L, Baeten J, et al. Infection with multiple human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants is associated with faster disease progression. J Virol 2003;77(23):12921-26. Presentation 12: Combined Oral Contraceptive Pills (COCs) 1. World Health Organization/Department of Reproductive Health and Research (WHO), Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health/Center for Communication Programs/INFO Project (CCP). Family Planning: A Global Handbook for Providers. Baltimore, MD and Geneva: CCP and WHO, 2007. 2. Ory, HW. The noncontraceptive health benefits from oral contraceptive use. Fam Plann Perspect 1982;14(4):182-84. 3. WHO, 2007. 4. WHO, 2007. 5. Belsey EM. Vaginal bleeding patterns among women using one natural and eight hormonal methods of contraception. Contraception 1988;38(2):181-206. 6. Davis AR, Westhoff C, O’Connel K, et al. Oral contraceptives for dysmenorrhea in adolescent girls: a randomized

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trial. Obstet Gynecol 2005;106(1):97-104. 7. Davis L, Kennedy SS, Moore J, et al. Modern combined oral contraceptives for pain associated with endometriosis. Cochrane Database of Syst Rev 2007;(3):CD001019. 8. World Health Organization (WHO). Cardiovascular Disease and Steroid Hormone Contraception. Report of a WHO Scientific Group, Technical Report Series, No. 877. Geneva: WHO, 1998. 9. WHO Collaborative Study of Neoplasia and Steroid Contraceptives. Breast cancer and combined oral contraceptives. Int J Epidemiol 1989;18:263-69. 10. Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast Cancer. Breast cancer and hormonal contraceptives: collaborative reanalysis of individual data on 53,297 women with breast cancer and 100,239 women without breast cancer from 54 epidemiological studies. Lancet 1996;347(9017):1713-27. 11. WHO Collaborative Study of Neoplasia and Steroid Contraceptives. Invasive cervical cancer and combined oral contraceptives. Br Med J 1985;290:961-65. 12. WHO Collaborative

Study of Neoplasia and Steroid Contraceptives. Combined oral contraceptives and liver cancer. Int J Cancer 1989;43:254-59. 13. World Health Organization (WHO). Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use. Third Edition. Geneva: WHO, 2004a; updated 2008. 14. WHO, 2004a; updated 2008. 15. WHO, 2004a; updated 2008. 16. Sekar VJ, Lefebvre E, Guzman SS, et al. Pharmacokinetic interaction between ethinyl estradiol, norethindrone and darunavir with low-dose ritonavir in healthy women. Antivir Ther 2008;13(4):563-69. 17. World Health Organization (WHO). Selected Practice Recommendations for Contraceptive Use. Second Edition. Geneva: WHO, 2004b. 18. WHO, 2004b; updated 2008. 19. WHO, 2004b; updated 2008. 20. WHO, 2007. 21. WHO, 2007. 22. Colton T, Dillow A, Hainsworth G, et al. Community Home-Based Care for People and Communities Affected by HIV/AIDS: A Comprehensive Training Course for Community Health Workers. Watertown, MA: Pathfinder International, 2006. Presentation References:

Contraception for Clients with HIV Curriculum page 5 Presentation 13: Injectable Contraceptives 1. World Health Organization/Department of Reproductive Health and Research (WHO), Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health/Center for Communication Programs/INFO Project (CCP). Family Planning: A Global Handbook for Providers. Baltimore, MD and Geneva: CCP and WHO, 2007. 2. WHO, 2007. 3. World Health Organization (WHO). Multinational comparative clinical trial of longacting injectable contraceptives: norethisterone enanthate given in two dosage regimens and depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate. Final report. Contraception 1983;28(1):1-20. 4. Pardthaisong T. Return of fertility after use of the injectable contraceptive Depo Provera: Up-dated data analysis. J Biosocial Science 1984;16(1):23-34. 5. Schwallie PC, Assenzo JR. The effect of depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate on pituitary and ovarian function, and the return of fertility following its discontinuation: a review.

Contraception 1974;10(2):181-202. 6. Koetsawang S. The effects of contraceptive methods on quality and quantity of breast milk. Int J Gynecol Obstet 1987;25(Suppl):115-27. 7. WHO Task Force for Epidemiological Research on Reproductive Health. Progestogenonly contraceptives during lactation: I. Infant growth. Contraception 1994;50:35-53. 8. WHO Task Force for Epidemiological Research on Reproductive Health. Progestogenonly contraceptives during lactation: II. Infant development. Contraception 1994;50:5568. 9. World Health Organization (WHO). Selected Practice Recommendations for Contraceptive Use. Second Edition. Geneva: WHO, 2004a; updated 2008. 10. Cromer BA, Blair JM, Mahan JD, et al. A prospective comparison of bone density in adolescent girls receiving depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (Depo-Provera), levonorgestrel (Norplant), or oral contraceptives. J Pediatr 1996;129:671-76. 11. Cundy T, Cornish J, Evans MC, et al. Recovery of bone density in women who stop using

medroxyprogesterone acetate. Br Med J 1994;308:247-48. 12. World Health Organization (WHO). Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use. Third Edition. Geneva: WHO, 2004b; updated 2008. 13. WHO, 2004b; updated 2008. 14. WHO, 2004b; updated 2008. 15. WHO, 2004b; updated 2008. 16. Mildvan D, Yarrish R, Marshak A, et al. Pharmacokinetic interaction between nevirapine and ethinyl estradiol/norethindrone when administered concurrently to HIV-infected women. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 2002;29(5):471-77. 17. Said S, Omar K, Koetsawang S, et al. A multicentred phase III comparative clinical trial of depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate given three-monthly at doses of 100 mg or 150 mg: 1. Contraceptive efficacy and side effects. World Health Organization Task Force on Long-Acting Systemic Agents for Fertility Regulation. Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction. Contraception 1986;34(3):223-35. 18. WHO, 2004a; updated 2008. 19. WHO, 2004a;

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updated 2008. 20. WHO, 2007. 21. WHO, 2004a; updated 2008. 22. Lei Z-W, Wu SC, Garceau RJ, et al. Effect of pretreatment counseling on discontinuation rates in Chinese women given depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate for contraception. Contraception 1996;53(6):357-61. Presentation References: Contraception for Clients with HIV Curriculum page 6 Presentation 14: Implants, POPs and Emergency Contraception 1. Hatcher RA, Trussell J, Nelson AL, et al. Contraceptive Technology. Nineteenth Revised Edition. New York: Ardent Media, Inc., 2007. 2. World Health Organization (WHO). Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use. Third Edition. Geneva: WHO, 2004; updated 2008. 3. World Health Organization/Department of Reproductive Health and Research (WHO), Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health/Center for Communication Programs/INFO Project (CCP). Family Planning: A Global Handbook for Providers. Baltimore, MD and Geneva: CCP and WHO, 2007. 4. Shoupe D, Mishell DR, Bopp BL, et

al. The significance of bleeding patterns with Norplant implants users. Obstet Gynecol 1991;77(2):256-60. 5. WHO, 2007. 6. WHO, 2004; updated 2008. 7. WHO, 2004; updated 2008. 8. WHO, 2004; updated 2008. 9. Mildvan D, Yarrish R, Marshak A, et al. Pharmacokinetic interaction between nevirapine and ethinyl estradiol/norethindrone when administered concurrently to HIV-infected women. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 2002;29(5):471-77. 10. WHO, 2004; updated 2008. 11. World Health Organization/Department of Reproductive Health and Research (WHO), Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health/Center for Communication Programs/INFO Project (CCP). Family Planning: A Global Handbook for Providers. Baltimore, MD and Geneva: CCP and WHO, 2008 update. 12. WHO, 2008 update. 13. WHO, 2004; updated 2008. 14. Sekar VJ, Lefebvre E, Guzman SS, et al. Pharmacokinetic interaction between ethinyl estradiol, norethindrone and darunavir with low-dose ritonavir in healthy women. Antivir Ther 2008;13(4):563-69

15. Hatcher. 16. WHO, 2004; updated 2008. 17. WHO, 2007. 18. WHO Task Force on Postovulatory Methods of Fertility Regulation. Randomised controlled trial of levonorgestrel versus the Yuzpe regimen of combined oral contraceptives for emergency contraception. Lancet 1998;352(9126):428-33. 19. Piaggio G, von Hertzen H, Grimes DA, et al. Timing of emergency contraception with levonorgestrel or the Yuzpe regimen. Lancet 1999;353(9154):721. 20. WHO, 2007. 21. von Hertzen H, Piaggio G, Ding J, et al. WHO Research Group on Post-ovulatory Methods of Fertility Regulation. Low dose mifepristone and two regimens of levonorgestrel for emergency contraception: a WHO multicentre randomised trial. Lancet 2002;360(9348):1803-10. 22. WHO Task Force on Postovulatory Methods of Fertility Regulation. 23. WHO, 2007. Presentation 15: Intrauterine Device (IUD or IUCD) 1. World Health Organization/Department of Reproductive Health and Research (WHO), Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health/Center for

Communication Programs/INFO Project (CCP). Family Planning: A Global Handbook for Providers. Baltimore, MD and Geneva: CCP and WHO, 2007. 2. Ortiz ME, Croxatto HB, Bardin CW. Mechanisms of action of intrauterine devices. Obstet Gynecol Surv 1996;1:42-51. Presentation References: Contraception for Clients with HIV Curriculum page 7 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. WHO, 2007 WHO, 2007. WHO, 2007. Larsson C, Milsom I, Jonasson K, et al. The long-term effects of copper surface area on menstrual blood loss and iron status in women fitted with an IUD. Contraception 1993;48(5):471-80. DeMaeyer EM, Dallman P, Gurney JM, et al. Preventing and Controlling Iron Deficiency Anaemia through Primary Health Care. A Guide for Health Administrators and Programme Managers. Geneva: World Health Organization, 1989. World Health Organization (WHO). Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use. Third Edition. Geneva: WHO,

2004a; updated 2008. WHO Special Programme of Research Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction. Long-term reversible contraception: twelve years of experience with the TCu380A and TCu220C. Contraception 1997;56(6):341-52. Shelton J. Risk of clinical pelvic inflammatory disease attributable to an intrauterine device. Lancet 2001;357(9253):443. World Health Organization (WHO). Selected practice recommendations for contraceptive use. Second Edition. Geneva: WHO, 2004b; updated 2008. World Health Organization (WHO). Mechanism of action, safety and efficacy of intrauterine devices. Report of a WHO Scientific Group. Geneva: WHO, 1987. Anteby E, Revel A, Ben-Chetrit A, et al. Intrauterine device failure: relation to its location within the uterine cavity. Obstet Gynecol 1993;81(1):112-14. O’Hanley K, Huber DH. Postpartum IUDs: keys for success. Contraception 1992;45(4):351-61. Zhang J, Feldblum P, Chi, IC, et al. Risk factors for Copper T IUD expulsion: an epidemiological

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analysis. Contraception 1992;46(5):427-33. Petersen KR, Brooks L, Jacobsen B, et al. Intrauterine devices in nulliparous women. Adv Contracept 1991;7(4):333-38. Sivin I, Greenslade F, Schmidt F, et al. The Copper T 380 Intrauterine Device: A Summary of Scientific Data. New York: The Population Council, 1992. O’Hanley. Morrison CS, Sekadde-Kigondu C, Sinei SK, et al. Is the intrauterine device appropriate contraception for HIV-1-infected women? BJOG 2001;108(8):784-90. Richardson BA, Morrison CS, Sekadde-Kigondu C, et al. Effect of intrauterine device on cervical shedding of HIV-1 DNA. AIDS 1999;13(15):2091-97. WHO, 2004a; updated 2008. WHO, 2004a; updated 2008. WHO, 2004a; updated 2008. WHO, 2004b; updated 2008. WHO, 2007. WHO, 2007. WHO, 2004b; updated 2008. WHO, 2007. WHO, 2007. Farr G, Amatya R. Contraceptive efficacy of the copper T380A and the multiload Cu250 IUD in three developing countries. Adv Contracept 1994;10:137-49. Presentation References: Contraception for Clients

with HIV Curriculum page 8 Presentation 16: Male and Female Sterilization 1. World Health Organization/Department of Reproductive Health and Research (WHO), Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health/Center for Communication Programs/INFO Project (CCP). Family Planning: A Global Handbook for Providers. Baltimore, MD and Geneva: CCP and WHO, 2007. 2. World Health Organization (WHO). Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use. Third Edition. Geneva: WHO, 2004a; updated 2008. 3. WHO, 2004a; updated 2008. 4. World Health Organization (WHO). Selected practice recommendations for contraceptive use. Second Edition. Geneva: WHO, 2004b; updated 2008. Presentation 17: Fertility Awareness-based Methods 1. World Health Organization/Department of Reproductive Health and Research (WHO), Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health/Center for Communication Programs/INFO Project (CCP). Family Planning: A Global Handbook for Providers. Baltimore, MD and Geneva: CCP and WHO, 2007.

2. Arévalo M, Jennings V, Sinai, I. Efficacy of a new method of family planning: The Standard Days Method. Contraception 2002;65(5):333-38. 3. Wilcox AJ, Dunson D, Baird DD. The timing of the “fertile window” in the menstrual cycle: Day specific estimates from a prospective study. BMJ 2000;321(7271):1259-62. 4. Arévalo. 5. World Health Organization (WHO). Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use. Third Edition. Geneva: WHO, 2004; updated 2008. Presentation 18: Lactational Amenorrhea Method and Infant Feeding Options 1. Hatcher RA, Trussell J, Nelson AL, et al. Contraceptive Technology. Nineteenth Revised Edition. New York: Ardent Media, Inc., 2007. 2. World Health Organization (WHO). Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use. Third Edition. Geneva: WHO, 2004; updated 2008. 3. Nduati R, John G, Mbori-Ngacha D, et al. Effect of breastfeeding and formula feeding on transmission of HIV-1: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA 2000;283(9):1167-74. 4. De Cock KM, Fowler

MG, Mercier E, et al. Prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission in resource-poor countries: translating research into policy and practice. JAMA 2000;283(9):1175-82. 5. World Health Organization (WHO). Consensus Statement – WHO HIV and Infant Feeding Technical Consultation. Held on behalf of the Inter-agency Task Team (IATT) on Prevention of HIV Infections in Pregnant Women, Mothers and their Infants, October 25-27, 2006. Geneva: WHO, 2006. 6. World Health Organization (WHO), United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF). HIV Transmission through Breastfeeding: A Review of Available Evidence. Geneva: WHO, 2004. 7. WHO, 2006. 8. World Health Organization (WHO), United States Department of Health and Human Services/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (HHS-CDC). Prevention of Motherto-Child Transmission of HIV (PMTCT) Generic Training Package: Trainer Manual (Module 2-9). Geneva: WHO, 2004. 9. WHO, 2006. 10. WHO, 2006. Presentation References: Contraception for Clients with HIV

Curriculum page 9 Presentation 19: Client-Provider Interaction – Client-Centered Counseling 1. Family Health International. Women’s Voices, Women’s Lives: The Impact of Family Planning – A Synthesis of Findings from the Women’s Studies Project. Research Triangle Park, NC: Family Health International, 1998. 2. Rinehart W, Rudy S, and Drennan M. GATHER guide to counseling. Popul Rep, Series J 1998;48:1-31. 3. EngenderHealth. Comprehensive Counseling for Reproductive Health. Trainers’ Manual: An Integrated Approach. New York: Engenderhealth, 2003. 4. World Health Organization (WHO). Reproductive Choices and Family Planning for People Living With HIV: Counseling Tool. Geneva: WHO, 2006. 5. León F, Vernon R, Martin A, et al. Balanced Counseling Strategy: User’s Guide. Washington, DC: Population Council, 2006. 6. Family Health International (FHI). Client-Provider Interaction: Family Planning Counseling, Contraceptive Technology Update Series. Research Triangle Park, NC:

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