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Source: http://www.doksinet University of Sydney MBLG 1001 and MBLG 1901 SEMESTER 2, 2009 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY and GENETICS MBLG1001 is designed to give you an introduction to Molecular Biology. It is a 6 credit point junior level course offered in 2nd semester. This course is essential for all students wishing to study either Biochemistry or Molecular Biology and Genetics at intermediate or senior levels, and is highly recommended for all students planning to study Biology at higher levels. The theory component of the course is presented in 25 lectures (2 per week). It covers the physical and chemical properties of the information containing biopolymers; nucleic acid and protein, and the flow of genetic information from DNA to RNA to Protein. The basic principles of molecular genetics are also introduced and some of the current techniques used in molecular biology research are presented. The practical course (6 five hour sessions; one every fortnight) gives you hands-on experience in

the methodology behind many of the modern techniques in molecular biology. It is hoped that at the end of this laboratory course you will have gained the strategies to design an assay to measure enzyme activity, to isolate macromolecules such as DNA, to perform and to analyse restriction digestions and to use spectrophotometry to identify compounds and measure their concentrations in a wide variety of experimental situations. These experiments have been chosen to give you a solid foundation from which you can later develop the more sophisticated techniques of molecular biology. A strong emphasis is placed in the acquisition of generic skills (such as writing, communication, computing, problem solving and experimental design) in the laboratory sessions. The advanced component is designed for students interested in continuing in molecular biology. It consists of 7 advanced lectures (replacing 7 regular lectures) and 3 advanced laboratory sessions (replacing 3 regular practical classes).

The advanced lectures will focus on the experiments which led to key discoveries in molecular biology. The advanced practical sessions will give students the opportunity to explore alternative molecular biology experimental techniques. Attendance at MBLG1999 seminars is strongly encouraged. MBLG1001 & MBLG1901 Handout page 1 Source: http://www.doksinet THE LECTURE COURSE Lecture Day Time Location MBLG1901 (Adv) 1st Monday 12 noon Chemistry Lecture Theatre 4 MBLG1901 (Adv) 2nd Wednesday 8 am Eastern Avenue Lecture Theatre 1st Monday 9 am Eastern Avenue Auditorium 1st lecture repeated Tuesday 9 am Eastern Avenue Auditorium 2nd Thursday 9 am Eastern Avenue Auditorium 2nd lecture repeated Friday 12 noon Eastern Avenue Auditorium Lecturers Your lecturers for this course are: Dr Dale Hancock Room 377, Biochemistry & Microbiology Building, Ph. 9351 4024, Email: d.hancock@usydeduau Assoc. Prof Gareth Denyer, School of Molecular & Microbial

Biosciences Email: gareth@sydney.edu Professor Mitchell Gus, School of Molecular & Microbial Biosciences Email: m.guss@usydeduau Professor Merlin Crossley, School of Molecular & Microbial Biosciences Email: merlinc@usyd.eduau Dr. Bruce Lyon, School of Biological Sciences, Email: b.lyon@usydeduau TEXTBOOK:   A custom publication entitled “An introduction to Molecular Biology” by Horton et al; Klug and Cummings is available from the Co-Op bookshop. Biology by Knox et al, your first semester Biology textbook is also recommended as an additional reference. MBLG1001 & MBLG1901 Handout page 2 Source: http://www.doksinet LECTURE OUTLINE MBLG1001 Week 1 Starting Lecture Mon Number th 27 July 1 2 2 Introduction to Molecular Biology Administrative details then introduces the scope of Molecular Biology, the concepts involved in the flow of genetic information. Why is life carbon based? 2 Molecules of Life: Biopolymers Introduces the general properties of

biopolymers, briefly describing the four classes of biopolymers. The distinction between sequence dependent, hence template directed versus non-sequence dependent is discussed. 3 Amino Acids: the building blocks of proteins The diversity of amino acid side chains is introduced by functional group, charges on amino acid side chains at physiological pH and phosphorylation and acetylation modifications are discussed. 4 Forming the Protein The formation of the peptide bond and its properties. The weak forces which maintain protein 3-D structure. Why proteins have secondary structures (alpha helix, beta sheet). Folded proteins and their function. 5 Protein Structure The importance of protein structure for function. Tertiary structures, subunits and quaternary structures. Examples of proteins that interact with nucleic acids, in a non-sequence specific and sequence specific manner. 6 Enzymes as Biological Catalysts What are enzymes? How do they work? Kinetics versus

thermodynamics. How do we measure enzyme activity? plus a brief introduction to kinetics, identifying Km, Kcat and Vmax. 7 Introduction to nucleic acids Presents the historical context to introduce DNA structure, the key experiments; Avery, McLeod et al, Waring blender, Chargaff, Watson and Crick. How the structure was solved Properties of genetic material. Nucleic acid structure The chemistry of nucleic acids starting with ribose/deoxyribose, bases, base pairing and tautomers, the formation of phosphodiester bonds, the major and minor grooves. How proteins interact in a base specific manner through the major groove. th 3 10 August 3 th 4 4 17 August Description 1 rd 3 August Title 8 MBLG1001 & MBLG1901 Handout page 3 Source: http://www.doksinet LECTURE OUTLINE MBLG1001 cont Week Starting Monday Lecture Number 24 August 5 9 10 Enzymology of Replication Enzymes involved in the of unwinding the strands, Supercoiled DNA and topoisomerases,

polymerisation and processing the Okazaki fragments, putting it all together. 11 Introduction to Transcription Transcription initiation, elongation and termination in prokaryotes. The structure and properties of Ecoli RNA polymerase, a multi-subunit enzyme, sigma subunit and initiation, Rho dependent and independent termination, polycistronic mRNA. 12 Regulation of Gene Expression Importance of regulating gene expression, transcriptional initiation as the major site, different sigma factors, proteins which control transcription. 13 The genetic code The triplet code, elucidation of the genetic code, degeneracy-synonyms, start codons, nonsense codons, frameshift mutations, role of tRNA, initiator RNA, formyl methionine in prokaryotes 14 Translation Review of the three different RNA types, mRNA, tRNA, rRNA , modified bases in tRNA. Amino acyl tRNA synthetase (details of its activity), structure and assembly of ribosomes, the catalytic role of RNA, translation by the E.coli

ribosome, initiation, elongation and release factors, 15 Eukaryotic Gene Expression Eukaryotic transcription, types of RNA polymerases, introns and exons, RNA splicing & processing, role of transcription factors, enhancers, eukaryotic translation, mitochondria. 16 DNA isolation Key Laboratory Restriction endonuclease digestion Techniques in Agarose gel electrophoresis Molecular DNA-DNA hybridization Genetics DNA amplification with the PCR 17 Genetic Mapping of Genomes st 6 31 August 6 th 7 7 September 7 th 8 14 September 8 st 9 21 September Description Semi-conservative replication, Meselson-Stahl experiment, Evidence for bidirectional replication in E. coli and the Introduction to problems it presents. InitiationThe search DNA DNA Replication polymerases and the discovery of DNA polI and Klenow. DNA pol I mutants th 5 Title MBLG1001 & MBLG1901 Handout Cystic Fibrosis: mapping the gene for an inherited disease Markers for genetic maps & linkage

Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) Gene mapping by human pedigree analysis, page 4 Source: http://www.doksinet LECTURE OUTLINE MBLG1001 cont week Starting Monday 9 Lecture Number 18 Title Description Physical Mapping of Genomes FISH (Fluorescent In Situ Hybridisation) Physical mapping by restriction digestion Chromosome walking Physical mapping & cloning of the CF mutant gene, Mid semester break th 10 5 October 10 Monday holiday 19 Whole Genome Analysis 20 Bacteria as model organisms Escherichia coli as Growing bacteria on solid & liquid media a Model Genetic Transposons, plasmids & bacteriophage System Mapping genes in bacteria, 21 Gene Cloning Fundamentals Plasmid cloning vectors Restriction, ligation & transformation Antibiotic selection Clone screening (insertional inactivation), 22 Gene Cloning Strategies Cloning genes or whole genomes Plasmid gene libraries cDNA & expression libraries Screening of gene libraries, 23

Disease diagnosis (RFLPs) Pre-natal Diagnosis DNA fingerprinting (VNTRs & microsatellites) & Genetic Testing Genetic testing (social & ethical issues), 24 Genetic transformation (somatic or germ-line) Mammals made-to-order (pharming & knockGene Therapy & outs) Pharmacogenomics Human gene therapy (CF mutant gene) Genetic medicine (DNA chips), 25 Sequence analysis of CF mutant gene alleles How do different alleles arise? Genes, Populations Changing frequencies of alleles in & Evolution populations lead to evolution Why are deleterious alleles maintained? th 11 12 October 11 th 12 19 October 12 th 13 13 26 October The Human Genome Project Structural, comparative & functional genomics Bioinformatics Proteomics, MBLG1001 & MBLG1901 Handout page 5 Source: http://www.doksinet LECTURE OUTLINE MBLG1901 Week 1 Starting Lecture Mon Number th 27 July 1 2 3rd August 2 10 August 3 4 17th August 4 Introduction to Molecular Biology

Administrative details then introduces the scope of Molecular Biology, the concepts involved in the flow of genetic information. Why is life carbon based? 2 Molecules of Life: Biopolymers Introduces the general properties of biopolymers, briefly describing the four classes of biopolymers. The distinction between sequence dependent, hence template directed versus non-sequence dependent is discussed. 3 Amino Acids: the building blocks of proteins The diversity of amino acid side chains is introduced by functional group, charges on amino acid side chains at physiological pH and phosphorylation and acetylation modifications are discussed. 4 Forming the Protein The formation of the peptide bond and its properties. The weak forces which maintain protein 3-D structure. Why proteins have secondary structures (alpha helix, beta sheet). Folded proteins and their function 5 Enzymes as Biological Catalysts What are enzymes? How do they work? Kinetics versus thermodynamics. How do we

measure enzyme activity? 6 Measuring Enzyme Action How do enzymes work? Quantitating enzyme activity – rate of the reaction, speed vs efficiency, Km, Kcat, Vmax 7 Introduction to Nucleic Acids How similar techniques were used to elucidate the structure of DNA. The experiments of McLeod, Avery & McCartney and Hershey & Chase, Chargaff, Watson and Crick 8 Nucleic acid structure (adv) Stability of DNA, UV absorbance, Negative charge, Detection by fluorescence, manipulating the weak forces, proteins that interact with DNA. 9 Semi-conservative replication, Meselson-Stahl experiment, Evidence for bidirectional replication in E. coli and the Introduction to problems it presents. InitiationThe search DNA DNA Replication polymerases and the discovery of DNA polI and Klenow. DNA pol I mutants 10 Enzymology of Replication th 5 5 24 August Description 1 th 3 Title MBLG1001 & MBLG1901 Handout Enzymes involved in the of unwinding the strands, Supercoiled DNA and

topoisomerases, polymerisation and processing the Okazaki fragments, putting it all together. page 6 Source: http://www.doksinet LECTURE OUTLINE MBLG1901 cont Starting Monday week 6 st 31 August 6 7 th 7 September 7 8 th 14 September 8 9 st 21 September Lecture Title Number Description 11 Introduction to Transcription Transcription initiation, elongation and termination in prokaryotes. The structure and properties of Ecoli RNA polymerase, a multi-subunit enzyme, sigma subunit and initiation, Rho dependent and independent termination, polycistronic mRNA. 12 Regulation of Gene Expression Importance of regulating gene expression, transcriptional initiation as the major site, different sigma factors, proteins which control transcription. The genetic code (adv) The triplet code, elucidation of the genetic code, degeneracy-synonyms, start codons, nonsense codons, frameshift mutations, role of tRNA, initiator RNA, formyl methionine in prokaryotes Experiments on

how the genetic code and the wobble were predicted (Crick) and how they were elucidated. 14 Translation Review of the three different RNA types, mRNA, tRNA, rRNA , modified bases in tRNA. Amino acyl tRNA synthetase (details of its activity), structure and assembly of ribosomes, the catalytic role of RNA, translation by the E.coli ribosome, initiation, elongation and release factors, 15 Eukaryotic Gene Expression Eukaryotic transcription, types of RNA polymerases, introns and exons, RNA splicing & processing, role of transcription factors, enhancers, eukaryotic translation, mitochondria. 16 Key Laboratory Techniques in Molecular Genetics DNA isolation, Restriction endonuclease digestion Agarose gel electrophoresis DNA-DNA hybridization DNA amplification with the PCR 17 Genetic Mapping of Genomes Cystic Fibrosis: mapping the gene for an inherited disease, Markers for genetic maps & linkage Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) Gene mapping by human

pedigree analysis, 13 MBLG1001 & MBLG1901 Handout page 7 Source: http://www.doksinet LECTURE OUTLINE MBLG1901 cont week Starting Monday 9 Lecture Number 18 Title Description Physical Mapping of Genomes th 28 Sept FISH (Fluorescent In Situ Hybridisation) Physical mapping by restriction digestion Chromosome walking Physical mapping & cloning of the CF mutant gene, Mid semester break th 10 5 October 10 19 20 Whole Genome Analysis (adv) 21 Bacteria as model organisms Escherichia coli as Growing bacteria on solid & liquid media a Model Genetic Transposons, plasmids & bacteriophage System Mapping genes in bacteria, 21 Gene Cloning Fundamentals Plasmid cloning vectors Restriction, ligation & transformation Antibiotic selection Clone screening (insertional inactivation), 22 Gene Cloning Strategies Cloning genes or whole genomes Plasmid gene libraries cDNA & expression libraries Screening of gene libraries 23 Pre-natal Diagnosis The power

of the PCR in disease diagnosis & & Genetic Testing forensic identification (adv) 24 Genetic transformation (somatic or germ-line) Mammals made-to-order (pharming & knockGene Therapy & outs) Pharmacogenomics Human gene therapy (CF mutant gene) Genetic medicine (DNA chips), 25 Genes, Populations Molecular insights into the workings of & Evolution (adv) evolution. th 11 12 October 11 th 12 19 October 12 th 13 13 26 October Monday Holiday MBLG1001 & MBLG1901 Handout The science & politics behind the Human Genome Project page 8 Source: http://www.doksinet LABORATORY OUTLINE MBLG1001 & 1901 Lab Session Title Description Introduction to Pipetting This prac session is designed to familiarise students with automatic pipettes, to introduce students to biochemical calculations and the use of Excel in a laboratory context. Assessment: lab calculations assignment. Introduction to Pipetting The calibration of pipettes will be checked

using 3 different methods of verification: weight, spectrophotometry and radioactivity. Assessment evaluation of validation methods, errors, accuracy and reproducibility Spectrophotometry Introduces students to absorption spectra in the visible range as a means of identification, extinction coefficients, conversion factors and finding the concentration of an unknown using a standard curve. Measuring enzyme Activity Students set up an enzyme assay to measure the rate of LDH activity in normal and abnormal sera. The rate is calculated from spectrophotometric data and the relationship between rate and [enzyme] is established. The tissue origin of the LDH in the abnormal sera is determined by zone electrophoresis. Assessment, both Normal and Advanced: diagnostic reports. DNA Isolation DNA is isolated from bacterial cultures of E. coli The yield and purity are assessed by UV spectrophotometry. Assessment: legend & protocol corrections, spectrum and yield calculations. DNA

isolation DNA is isolated from bacterial cultures of E. coli The yield and purity are assessed by UV spectrophotometry and Sybr fluorimetric assay. Assessment: Evaluate methods of quantifying RNA and DNA, differences in RNA and DNA. 5 Restriction Digestion and Electrophoresis The quality of the DNA from last session is assessed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Digestion of lambda DNA by restriction enzymes and the separation of fragments by agarose gel electrophoresis is investigated.Assessment; Both normal and advanced: Short report and separate Bioinformatics exercises 6 Skills Test Assess pipetting, spectrophotometry, basic lab calculations and Excel; both normal & advanced. 1 1adv 2 3 4 4adv MBLG1001 & MBLG1901 Handout page 9 Source: http://www.doksinet ASSESSMENT: MBLG1001 & MBL1901 The lecture component of the course is worth 50% of the final assessment and the material is assessed in one 2.5 h exam held in the exam period Two thirds of the marks in

this exam are awarded to questions relating to the lecture material. The practical component contributes 50% to the final mark and is assessed both with insemester tasks (a calculations assignment, laboratory reports and a skills test) and in the end-ofsemester 2.5 h exam For a more detailed assessment breakdown refer to the table below ASSESSMENT Calculations Assignment (MBLG1001), 10 basic laboratory calculations involving concentration, # moles, dilutions, pH Pipette calibration report (MBLG1901) includes a discussion of errors, accuracy and reproducibility and an evaluation of the 3 methods for validating the pipette calibration (weight, spectrophotometry and radioisotopes). DNA isolation (MBLG1001) including legend & protocol corrections, spectrum, yield and concentration calculations DNA isolation (MBLG1901) includes an evaluation of the various methods of quantifying nucleic acids and distinguishing DNA from RNA DNA electrophoresis (MBLG1001) includes identification of

unknown restriction enzyme and virtual digest. DNA electrophoresis (MBLG1901) includes identification of unknown restriction enzyme and bioinformatics exercises. LDH diagnostic report (MBLG1001) includes the experimental results and summary report. LDH diagnostic report (MBLG1901) includes the experimental results and proteomics. Skills Test (MBLG1001 & 1901) includes Excel, pipetting, spectrophotometry and calculations. Lab Notebooks (MBLG1001 & 1901) End of Semester Exam (MBLG1001), a 2.5 hour exam paper held in the exam period. This paper includes BOTH theory and theory of prac questions . End of Semester Exam (MBLG1901), a 2.5 hour exam paper held in the exam period. This paper includes BOTH theory and theory of prac questions . TOTAL MBLG1001 & MBLG1901 Handout MBLG1901 MARKS MBLG1001 MARKS 20 20 10 10 10 10 10 10 40 40 10 10 200 200 300 300 page 10 Source: http://www.doksinet However, a pass in both the theory and practical sections is essential. The

Schools of Molecular and Microbial Biosciences (MMB) and Biological Sciences adhere to the Academic Board and Faculty of Science recommendations regarding the award of merit grades. Therefore, ALL marks are PROVISIONAL until your final grade is ratified at the Examiners meeting. In other words, marks for any component can be scaled up or down to meet academic board guidelines. SUBMISSION OF ASSESSMENTS There is no group work in MBLG1001 or MBLG1901, beyond reports which may be handed in as a pair. If reports are handed in as a pair both partners will receive the same mark If you want to hand in separate work you may. For separate submissions please ensure ONLY your name appears on the report. THERE WILL BE NO REPORTS HANDED IN AS A GROUP OF THREE OR MORE. If the experiment is carried out as a threesome (and this sometimes happens with odd numbered practical groups) each member of the group must hand in an individual report. All assessment tasks must be handed in at the beginning of

the following laboratory session to your assigned demonstrator. Any assignment handed in later than 15 mins after the beginning of the lab session will incur a late penalty (see page 14 of this handout). Any reports which are handed in late, with or without an application for special consideration, must be submitted to Dr. Hancock or Dr Kant (in room 377) A coversheet (located in a tray just outside the door and WebCT) must be filled in and attached to each late report. PHARMACY students should hand late reports to Dr. Katie Jakes in Carslaw Room 513 ASSESSMENT TASK COURSE MODE Calculations Assignment MBLG1001 Individually, handwritten Pipetting Report MBLG1901 Individually, typed (Word) DNA Isolation Report MBLG1001 Pairs, typed (Word) DNA Isolation Report MBLG1901 Pairs, typed (Word) DNA Electrophoresis Report MBLG1001 Pairs, typed (Word) DNA Electrophoresis Report MBLG1901 Pairs, typed (Word) LDH Diagnostic Report MBLG1001 Pairs, typed (Word) LDH Diagnostic

Report MBLG1901 Pairs, typed (Word) Lab Notebooks MBLG1001 & 1901 Individually, handwritten (see Skills Test MBLG1001 & 1901 Individually Record keeping section of lab manual) MBLG1001 & MBLG1901 Handout page 11 Source: http://www.doksinet Plagiarism A Plagiarism Compliance Statement (see introduction section in your lab manual) covering all assessment tasks for the semester MUST be signed and submitted with your first assignment (the calculations assignment, MBLG1001 or the Pipetting Report, MBLG1901). Submitted reports, which appear to be copied or otherwise plagiarized may be seen as evidence of academic misconduct and may be subject to an investigation by the University Registrar. The University policy on plagiarism may be viewed at: http://www.usydeduau/senate/policies/Plagiarismpdf Plagiarism detection strategies are employed both for in-semester assessments and in the final examination. THE PRACTICAL CLASSES General Arrangements Each student will do a

5 h practical session once every fortnight. These laboratory classes are not only designed to complement and augment the material taught in lectures but also to teach you a wide range of scientific and generic skills (i.e the sorts of skills much loved by employers) Practical classes commence in the FIRST week of the Semester. Practical classes will be held in laboratory Room 380 (located on the right-hand side of Level 3 as you enter the Biochemistry building from Wentworth). Classes run from 1 to 6 pm Monday to Friday. Pharmacy students will do their laboratories in Carslaw 301 Classes run from 1 to 6 pm Tuesday – Thursday. Depending on the other subjects you are studying, you will be allocated to a practical class on one of these days, on either odd or even weeks. In each practical class you will be placed in a particular group (usually 16 - 18 students) and supervised by a designated demonstrator. It is particularly important that you do not miss the first hour of each practical

class when the introductory talk is given. Failure to attend will disadvantage you for the successful completion and understanding of the experiment. Your allocated Practical Group will have a name such as: 2TueA. The 2 denotes you will do your labs on even weeks (weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12), the TueA means you will have practical classes on Tuesday in group A. If you are unable to attend on your allocated practical day: You must contact Dr. Hancock or Dr Kant BEFORE your first practical session You may be allowed to switch days but you must provide reasons for needing to change IN WRITING. PHARMACY students should follow the same procedures but see Dr. Katie Jakes in Carslaw Room 513 MBLG1001 & MBLG1901 Handout page 12 Source: http://www.doksinet YOU MUST NOT TAKE IT UPON YOURSELF TO CHANGE PRACTICAL GROUPS. Group change requests must be channeled through Dr. Hancock or Dr Kant All requests must be made in writing. For Science students: MMB Class Computer Facilities There

are +20 Macintosh computers in the laboratory. You may use the computer facility on any day from 9.30 am - 430 pm Computers may ONLY be used for MBLG specific work In particular, the printers must NOT be used to print out any material that is not directly connected with your practical class. During lab classes, priority will be given to those students who are involved in the lab class at the time. For Pharmacy students: BIOLOGY Class Computer Facilities There are 15 Macintosh computers in the laboratory available for use during practical sessions, and 10 Macintosh computers in the Lizard Lounge (Carslaw Room 507) available for use Mon-Thu between 9:00 am and 5:00 pm and Fri between 9:00 am and 12:30 pm. Please only use computers for MBLG specific work. Printers must not be used to print out material not directly related to your practical class. If you miss a laboratory session: It is a faculty rule that you MUST attend >90% of practical classes, even with medical certification.

This means that if you miss more than one class, you cannot expect to pass the practical course. In special circumstances, however, it is possible to make up classes and this can be arranged with either Dr. Hancock or Dr Kant DO NOT TAKE IT UPON YOURSELF TO OMIT AND/OR ENTER SPECIFIC SESSIONS. The Laboratory Manual: The resource manual for the course is available from the University Co-op Bookshop (near the Noel Martin Recreation Centre) at a cost of $15. Make sure you buy the current FIRST year manual (not a second or third year one). The first year manual is green! What else do I need to bring to Laboratory Classes? • A hard covered bound notebook. ALL original data (including gel pictures, calculations, etc) must be recorded in this book. This book should serve you as a life-long resource of tips, tricks and notes. Section 3 on record keeping will provide some hints • A marker pen for writing on glassware; use the type in which the ink is insoluble in water. • A pair of

safety glasses. • A calculator, preferably not your mobile phone. • Filled-in shoes, no thongs or sandals! • A laboratory coat. MBLG1001 & MBLG1901 Handout page 13 Source: http://www.doksinet Before coming to lab classes. BE VERY SURE TO READ THE SECTION IN YOUR RESOURCE MANUAL ON LABORATORY SAFETY. THE SKILLS TEST General Arrangements As part of the assessment of MBLG1001 and MBLG1901 ALL students must sit a practical skills test. This test will assess your competence at certain laboratory skills: automatic pipetting, spetrophotometry and spreadsheet skills, as well as data manipulation and interpretation and written communication.    The skills tests will be run in weeks 11 – 13. If you are unable to sit your skills test on the designated day, arrangements must be made with Dr. Hancock or Dr Kant to do the test on another day. ALL students must attempt the skills test to pass MBLG1001 or MBLG1901. If you have been unable to sit the test throughout the

skills test period, a make-up skills test will be organized for you in StuVac, subject to the approval of your special consideration application. Students are allowed (indeed encouraged) to use their laboratory notebooks (BUT not their laboratory resource manuals) in the skills test. There are, however, certain rules governing acceptable material in the lab notebook. These rules are designed to encourage you to keep your notebook throughout the semester and to include in this notebook all the tips, strategies, hints and calculations that you have learned along the way. You will always learn something better if it is handwritten (by you) rather than simply photocopied the night before the test. With this in mind:     Laboratory notebooks must be handwritten. The only photocopied items from the laboratory resource manual acceptable in the notebook are the dye spectra from the spectrophotometry practical, the safety rules and the pipette tables from the introductory section. Typed

reports, printed spreadsheets and gel scans are all acceptable. Printed out answers to the calculations assignments are NOT acceptable, however, handwritten model answers are acceptable and, again, are encouraged. Printed out Powerpoint tutorials are NOT allowed, although handwritten notes from these tutorials are acceptable. Demonstrated Competence in the Use of automatic Pipettes. One of the skills tested in the skills test is the correct use of automatic pipettes. This skill is considered so essential to the study of molecular biology that ALL students MUST demonstrate competence in the use of these pipettes before they can pass MBLG1001/1901 or be allowed to progress to any intermediate courses in molecular biology, biochemistry, genetics or microbiology. If a student does not demonstrate a sufficient level of competence in the pipetting exercise in the skills MBLG1001 & MBLG1901 Handout page 14 Source: http://www.doksinet test, he or she will be required to come back at

an agreed time in StuVac and review the use of these pipettes before being signed off. POLICY ON SPECIAL CONSIDERATION It is Faculty of Science policy that there are no Supplementary Examinations for courses which are only studied for one semester. However, we recognise that sickness or other misadventures can have an adverse effect on your performance. Therefore, we have set up the following procedures to ensure that you are not disadvantaged because of illness or other problems. The MMB Special Consideration policy can be viewed at: http://www.mmbusydeduau/current students/ For in-Semester work: For late lab reports, calculations assignments etc.; lateness attracts a penalty of 10% (of the original mark) per day. After 10 days, therefore, a mark of zero is returned However, ALL work must be handed in for you to complete the course. • In cases of illness or misadventure, where an extension is requested you MUST apply for special consideration with the science faculty. The process

and the relevant forms can be found at the following website: http://www.scienceusydeduau/current/ug/special consideration application packpdf • Applying for Special Consideration:  The student obtains an Application for Special Consideration form from the Student Information Office or the Faculty website above. Please note that any requests for a unit of study taught by another Faculty must be submitted at that Faculty Office, and not at the Faculty of Science.  The student lodges the original of the application form and originals of any supporting documentation at the Student Information Office. Where it is not possible to obtain original documentation (e.g death certificate, police report), submission of a certified copy will be permitted. All other forms submitted must be originals, including the Professional Practitioners Certificate (PPC). Please note that it is also necessary to provide a copy of the application and all documentation for each unit of study in which

consideration is being sought, to be certified by the Faculty and forwarded by the student to the School for assessment (i.e if you are applying for consideration for three units of study, you must submit the original documentation plus three copies).  For consideration due to serious illness a student must have a registered medical practitioner or counsellor complete the Professional Practitioners Certificate, which is attached to the application form. MBLG1001 & MBLG1901 Handout page 15 Source: http://www.doksinet  For consideration due to misadventure, a Professional Practitioners Certificate or other form of appropriate documentation is required which indicates the likely duration and effect of the misadventure on the student’s performance. Please note that only the supporting documents provided at the time of initial application for Special Consideration will be used to assess the request. It will not be possible to submit further documentation relating to an

initial application once an application has been lodged with the Student Information Office. Only those circumstances brought to the attention of staff at the time of lodgment will be taken into consideration when formulating an academic judgment. Special Consideration applications must be lodged with the Student Information Centre within seven (7) days of the missed class.  The Student Information Office checks the application at time of lodgment to ensure that a student’s documentation is adequate and if so, will sign/stamp both the original application form as well as the student’s copies to confirm lodgement of the application at the office. The Student Information Office will enter the details contained on the application form into the Special Consideration database, which will be used to monitor the progress of the application.  The student takes the stamped and dated application form and documentation to the relevant Unit of Study Coordinator or School Administration

Office for assessment. Please note that this must be done for each Unit of Study for which consideration is being sought.  When an academic judgment has been entered into the Special Consideration database, the Faculty will communicate the decision to the student via an e-mail to the student’s University e-mail address. It is expected that a response will be received by the student within seven (7) days of initial application. What you should do if you miss an exam because of sickness or misadventure. If you are unable to sit an end-of-semester exam, you must apply for Special Consideration following the procedure outlined above, including submission of appropriate supporting documentation, within seven (7) days from the date of the exam. If a student does not sit an examination and is not granted Special Consideration, a grade of AF (Absent Fail) will result for that UoS. All messages and Special Consideration Forms MUST be left with the Student Support Office (level 4, Biochem

building G08). As a result of the above, you may be permitted to sit for a deferred examination. It will be held on Friday, 27th November. This will be a different paper This exam will cover the same material as the original exam, but will contain new questions and may be in a different format. There will be no further testing SIDs of those students eligible to sit this deferred exam will be posted on the WebCT. IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO FIND OUT IF YOU ARE ELIGIBLE TO SIT THE DEFERRED EXAM. MBLG1001 & MBLG1901 Handout page 16