Education | Higher education » SUSS Singapore University of Social Sciences

Datasheet

Year, pagecount:2020, 77 page(s)
Language:English
Downloads:3
Uploaded:April 07, 2022
Size:1 MB
Institution:SUSS Singapore University of Social Sciences

Attachment:-

Download in PDF:Please log in!

Comments

Nobody commented on this document yet. You can be the first one!


New comment

Content extract

Student Handbook (for undergraduate programmes) Updated: 20 July 2020 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Introduction 1 Glossary of Terms 2 Section 1 Section 2 Section 3 Section 4 Section 5 APPENDIX Registration and Course Enrolment 1.1 Enrolment 1.2 Course registration 1.3 Requirements as to courses 1.4 Transferring to another programme 1.5 Deferment 1.6 Withdrawal from course 1.7 Withdrawal from programme 1.8 Cancellation of enrolment by University 1.9 Academic progression policy 4 4 5 8 9 10 11 11 12 Academic Matters 2.1 Assessment and examination 2.2 Challenge Examination 2.3 Challenge Examination Waiver 14 16 16 Study Skills, Resources and Support 3.1 Study skills and support 3.2 Library services 3.3 Class sessions and projects 3.4 Reports, assignments and essays 3.5 Support and counselling 3.6 C-three (Counselling & Care Corner) 3.7 Student records 3.8 Communication via MyMail account 3.9 Facilities, equipment and services 18 19 20 21 21 21 21 23 23 Money Matters 4.1

Types of fees 4.2 Payment methods 4.3 Responsibility for fees 4.4 Late payment or non-payment 4.5 Refunds 4.6 Government tuition grant / subsidy 4.7 Financial Aid 4.8 Miscellaneous Fees 25 25 25 25 25 25 28 28 Rules and Regulations 5.1 Policies and Procedures A. Personal Data Protection B. Personal Representation to the Media C. Smoking Restriction on Campus D. Drug-related Offences E. Student Grievance Procedure F. Sexual Misconduct Complaint Resolution Procedure G. Student Disciplinary Regulations H. Student Fee Regulations 5.2 Academic Rules and Regulations A. Assessment and Examination Regulations B. Graduation Regulations Honour Code 29 29 30 31 31 32 34 43 56 57 57 70 75 SINGAPORE UNIVERSITY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES Student Handbook INTRODUCTION Purpose of this Handbook This Handbook provides you with information on certain important aspects of University life – the sources of available help, support services and key regulations applicable to all students. While the

information provided in this Handbook was correct at the time of publication, the University reserves the right to alter procedures, fees and regulations should the need arise. You should carefully read all official correspondence, other sources of information for students and the official University notice boards to be aware of changes to the information in this Handbook. Apart from this Handbook, you will receive other course/study guides at the start of your studies, produced by your School, setting out all the essential information pertaining to your programme of study and the academic requirements. The University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice. You should always check with your School’s officers when planning your courses Some courses and units may be altered or may not be offered due to insufficient registration or changes to teaching personnel. Rights and Responsibilities You have both rights and responsibilities as a student at

the University. The formal relationship between you and the University is set out in the Honour Code and, for students enrolled before January 2018, the Student Contract which you signed at enrolment. This included an undertaking to abide by all the University’s rules and regulations. The key rules and regulations are set out in Section 5 of this Handbook. The Honour Code is set out in the Appendix to this Handbook The University is keen to ensure that your student experience is a positive one. Making your views known can help to bring about improvements, both for you and for future students. If you feel something is not right, please raise your concerns promptly. The complaint resolution procedures (see Section 5.1) provides guidance on how you can initially try to resolve the problem informally and also sets out the more formal procedures available to you. Equality The University values the diversity of the student body and is committed to creating and sustaining a positive and

mutually supportive environment. All students are equally valued and respected and are encouraged to thrive academically. Page 1 GLOSSARY OF TERMS AT Academic Termination Canvas The University’s learning management system CET Continuing Education and Training CEX Challenge Examination CEX waiver an exemption of a student from sitting for a CEX for one or more specific courses in a programme CGPA Cumulative Grade Point Average Credit exemption a credit exemption award exempts a student from one or more specific courses in a programme Credit recognition a credit recognition award reduces the number of cu that a student needs to obtain to qualify for the degree that he/she is pursuing CP Curriculum Plan cu Credit Unit DAB Disciplinary Appeals Board EA Examination Administration Department EAC Examinations and Awards Committee eCR Electronic Course Registration GPA Grade Point Average GS General Studies HoP Head of Programme MyMail the email

account provided by the University to each student for use in the course of his/her studies with the University OCAS Overall Continuous Assessment Score OES Overall Examinable Score OSAR Office of Student and Alumni Relations RS Rank Score SASC Student Affairs and Support Committee SDG Student Disciplinary Group TMA Tutor-marked Assignment TOP Transfer of Programme U/C/SUSS Core University’s Courses, Common Courses or SUSS Courses that constitute the University’s Core Courses Page 2 working day Any day that the University is open for business and excludes Saturdays, Sundays, gazetted public holidays and University shutdown days. Page 3 Section 1 Enrolment and Course Registration Enrolment is the process through which you formalise your agreement with the University to undertake your studies for a given academic programme. When you enrol, you become entitled to receive tuition, use the University’s facilities and ultimately receive the qualification

for which you are studying. It also imposes on you an obligation to pay all tuition and other applicable fees to the University. The sanction against non-payment of debts to the University begins with having certain services withdrawn (e.g library and computing access) and can lead to withdrawal of your enrolment. The University wants to help you resolve any financial, academic and/or other problems that you may have. Please contact the Student Support Department for help in dealing with any difficulties as soon as possible in order to resolve these prior to course registration. 1.1 Enrolment 1.11 New students. To be admitted into the University, you must accept the University’s offer of a programme on or before the specified deadline. If you fail to do so, the University’s offer will be deemed to have been withdrawn. 1.12 Existing students. You are entitled to continue your studies in each subsequent semester, provided: (a) (b) (c) (d) 1.13 1.2 you are not in debt to the

University; you have completed the electronic course registration for the following semester (see Section 1.21 below); you have made academic progress within the maximum candidature period (see Section 1.81 below); and you have a valid pass which has not expired, if you are not a Singapore Citizen. Second University degree. You will not be admitted to a second degree programme at the University until you have fulfilled the requirements for the first degree programme with the University. Course registration 1.21 Electronic Course Registration (“eCR”). The eCR is an important tool to help you plan the course(s) that you would like to read (including those that you need to repeat) for the following semester . In April and October of each year, you will be informed via an announcement in the Student Portal to choose your next semester’s course(s) by the stipulated deadline through the eCR (assuming that you pass all the courses in the then current semester). If you do not submit

your course registration by the stipulated deadline, you will not be able to proceed to the next stage of your programme and your enrolment may be withdrawn at the discretion of the University (see Section 1.82 below). Please refer to the eCR guide for more information Note: You are required to complete your course registration notwithstanding that you do not wish to take any course in the following academic semester or that you will complete your programme (i.e acquiring remaining final cu) by the end of the then current academic semester. This enables you to exercise your option to "repeat" if necessitated by your results of the then current semester. 1.22 Offer of course(s). The final decision of the University to offer you the course(s) indicated by you via the eCR will depend on your course results for the then current semester as well as the available vacancies in the course(s) selected by you. If you Page 4 had submitted via the eCR by the stipulated deadline,

you will receive a course offer notification via e-services in the Student Portal after the release of your results for the then current semester. To accept your course offer, follow the instructions in the notification on payment and other related matters by the stipulated deadline(s). If you do not accept by the stipulated deadline, the University shall be deemed to have withdrawn its offer of course(s). Any future reinstatement will be entirely at the Universitys discretion. 1.23 Amending course choices. To make changes to your choice of courses after the eCR registration deadline, please submit the Add/Drop application through the e-services in the Student Portal before the Add/Drop deadline set out in the course offer notification. All applications are subject to the University’s approval. 1.24 Over/under-subscribed courses. For under-subscribed and over-subscribed courses, your choice of reserved courses will be offered to you, subject to availability. Note: It is your

responsibility to ensure that there are no timetable schedule conflicts for the courses that you wish to take (i.e both class timetable and examination timetable) and that you have registered for the correct courses based on the graduation requirements of your programme. Class Timetable information can be found in the Curriculum Plans (“CP”) and the eCR Registration Page. For classes with external timetables, a separate file is uploaded on the first page of the eCR system. Examination timetable information can be found via a separate file upload in the first page of the eCR system and the eCR Registration Page. 1.3 Requirements as to courses 1.31 Course criteria. You may register for a course only if you have fulfilled the pre-requisites (if any) for that course. Courses are spread over 6 or 13 study weeks from January to April and July to October, with examinations in May and November. Each degree programme is comprised of compulsory and elective courses. Each course has a

value of cu. 1.32 Credit units. You may only register for up to the following total cu (“cu”) of courses per semester: (a) Full-time students - 40 cu (of which a maximum of 30 cu will be for first attempt(s) and/or repeat(s) and the remaining 10 cu will be for re-sit examinations, if any). You may request to do an additional 5 cu if you have a CGPA above 3.0; (b) Part-time students - 30 cu (of which a maximum of 20 cu will be for first attempt(s) and/or repeat(s) and the remaining 10cu will be for re-sit examinations, if any). You may also choose a limited number of additional courses during course registration. These additional courses are considered as your reserved courses and are to be used only in the event that any of the main courses that you chose has reached its course quota or is not offered. Students enrolled on or after January 2007 are permitted to take up the quota of 10 cu of U/SUSS Core courses in a single semester in addition to the cap of 30 cu for that

semester. Note: It is very important to assess your state of readiness for a course in order to avoid academic difficulties. Please consult your HoP for advice on whether your choice of courses is sensible in the light of your current academic progress. You should take note that taking 30 cu (for a full-time student) / 20 cu (for a part-time student) Page 5 in a semester is considered a heavy study workload. You should be mindful of your academic progress before deciding on the number of cu to register. If you are in doubt, it is always beneficial to consult your HoP from the School. 1.33 English Language Proficiency Requirement. All students (with the exception of those reading Chinese, Early Childhood, Malay and Tamil undergraduate programmes) have to meet the University’s English Language proficiency requirement. (a) Full-time students – students from the 2018 cohort onwards who fail the essay component of the 4-stage interview process will be required to pass SDE103 and

SDE 104 before graduation. Exception: All full time students who are sponsored by the Ministry of Home Affairs for the Bachelor of Public Safety and Security with Minor programme are required to complete SDE103 and SDE104 before graduation. (b) Part-time students - With effect from January 2019 intake, passing SDE101 – Essential English Skills and English Proficiency Assessment is a graduating requirement for those who did not meet the University’s English Language proficiency requirement. The fee for SDE 101 will be waived for the first attempt and it will be charged at $36.90 (inclusive of GST) for the second and each subsequent attempts. If you do not pass SDE101, you will be required to take the four Language Enhancement Courses (“LEC”) which are either free of charge or cost between $70 and $80 each (inclusive of GST). The following shall also apply: (i) if you do not meet the University’s English Language proficiency requirement and did not attempt SDE101 by the end

of your first semester of study, you will only be permitted to take 10 cu of courses in the next following semester; (ii) if you fail SDE101, you must complete the four LECs that are designed to strengthen your English Language skills and help you do better in your academic studies; (iii) you are advised to take at least one LEC per term. If you fail SDE101 or any of the LECs in a semester, you will be restricted to a maximum of 10 cu for the next following semester as applicable; (iv) if you wish to be exempted from the LECs, you may consider the following: (1) Retake and pass SDE101; or Note: (2) you are allowed to re-take one year after each previous attempt until you have 40 cu remaining in your candidature. Thereafter, you will have unlimited attempts to re-take SDE101 every semester Score an equivalent passing grade for IELTS (6.5) or a TOEFL score of 580 (paper-based) or 237 (computer-based) or 85 (internet-based). For students enrolled prior to January 2019 intake,

the following shall apply: (v) If you do not meet the University’s English Language proficiency requirement and did not attempt SDE101 by the end of your first semester of study, you will be restricted to take only 10 cu of courses in the next following semester; Page 6 (vi) if you fail SDE101, you must complete four LECs that are designed to strengthen your English Language skills and help you do better in your academic studies; Note: 1.34 Completion of LECs is required until you pass SDE101 or attain at least a ‘D’ grade for COR160; (vii) you are advised to take at least one LEC per term. If you fail SDE101 or any of the LECs, you will be restricted to a maximum of 10 cu in the next following semester (as applicable); (viii) if you wish to be exempted from the LECs, you may consider the following: (1) re-take and pass SDE101; or (2) obtain at least a grade D for COR160; or (3) score an equivalent passing grade for IELTS (6.5) or TOEFL (580 paper- based, 237

computer-based or 85 internet-based). University/Common/SUSS core (“U/C/SUSS Core”) Courses. The objective of U/C/SUSS Core courses is to broaden curriculum and impart to the students a common set of skills and areas of knowledge beyond their chosen academic disciplines. (a) Full-time students – students from the 2018 cohort onwards, are required to complete 40 cu of SUSS Core courses (i.e 10 cu compulsory, 10 cu restricted and 20 cu unrestricted); Students from pre-2018 cohort: (i) Students from the 2014 to 2017 cohorts with outstanding Common Core cu are required to complete SUSS Core course(s) in replacement. (b) Part-time students – With effect from January 2019 intake, students are required to complete 10 cu of SUSS Core course i.e 10 cu Compulsory; Students from pre-January 2019 intakes: (i) students from the January 2007 to July 2009 intakes are required to complete a compulsory 4 cu course: i.e Effective Communication (COR100) and any two other 3 cu courses to be

selected from the University’s list of offerings; (ii) (c) (d) students from the January 2010 to July 2018 intakes are required to complete Essential Academic Writing Skills (COR160) and any other courses in the University Core Basket 1 or 2 or 3. The basis of assessment for each U/C/SUSS Core course is available in the relevant course material. There are 2 types of assessment bases for U/C/SUSS Core courses: (i) the overall continuous assessment score (“OCAS”) + the overall examinable score (“OES”) = 100% (ii) OCAS = 100% For some U/C/SUSS Core courses, there is no re-sit option if students withdraw or fail any component of the U/C/SUSS Core courses. Except for Effective Communication (COR100) or Essential Academic Writing Skills (COR160), such students can choose to repeat the same U/C/SUSS Core courses or select from a list of other course offerings in the U/C/SUSS Core curriculum. If a student fails COR100 and/or COR160, he/she must repeat these course(s). If you

are Page 7 from the July 2016 intake or after, you must complete and pass SDE105 before you are allowed to repeat COR160; 1.4 (e) Students may take courses within the U/C/SUSS Core curriculum on top of the maximum permitted course load for a semester; (f) Part-time students reading Chinese and Tamil programmes will follow the U/SUSS Core courses specified in their respective CP. 1.35 Graduation requirement. A full-time student must complete the programme’s cu and non-cu requirements and a part-time student must complete the programme’s cu requirements to graduate. Please refer to Graduation Regulations in Section 52 1.36 Re-reading courses. You cannot register to read a course for which you have already been awarded a course credit or a course certificate. 1.37 Pending results. Typically, a few students in each semester may have course results that are pending. If your course allocation for the following semester is dependent on the results that are pending, the

University will allow you to continue with your studies based on the courses that you have chosen until all your results that are pending have been finalised. 1.38 Collection of course materials. Information on the collection of course materials will be announced through the Student Portal. Transferring to another programme (“TOP”) 1.41 University’s policy. The University’s policy on transfer of programmes (“TOP”) is as follows: (a) The University currently offers the following programmes: (i) basic degree programmes (“Basic Degree”); (ii) basic degree with honours programmes (“Basic with Honours”). Students who have successfully completed the basic degree are invited by the University to proceed to the honours phase of the programme only if they meet the requirements for honours set by the University; and (iii) direct honours degree programmes (“Direct Honours”). (b) Full-time students may only apply to transfer to a part-time programme that will

continue to be offered by the University. (c) Part-time students undertaking a Basic Degree programme or a Direct Honours programme may only apply to transfer to: (i) another Basic Degree programme or equivalent; or (ii) another Direct Honours programme; provided that the new programme will continue to be offered by the University. (d) Part-time students in a Basic with Honours programme and who have completed the basic degree portion of the programme are not permitted to apply to transfer to any other programmes. Page 8 (e) Students who transfer into another programme must ensure that they can complete the new programme in the remaining period of candidature. If you were enrolled in or after January 2016 and wish to transfer to another programme that requires a minimum English Language Proficiency requirement, you must meet the English Language Proficiency requirement (see section 1.33) If the requirement is not met, you will be required to attempt SDE101, Essential

Skills and English Proficiency Assessment by the end of the transfer effective semester. Students who do not attempt SDE101 will be restricted to take only 10cu of courses in the next following semester. 1.42 1.43 1.5 Degree students. (a) Applications to transfer can only be made during the TOP application period. You will need to complete and submit the online “Application for Transfer of Programme” form together with a non-refundable fee of S$214.00 (inclusive of GST). Applications received after the stipulated application deadline will only be considered at the next TOP period. (b) Transfer applications are not automatically approved. You must meet the admission requirements of the new programme that you wish to transfer to. You will also need to check if any funding arrangements you have in place will be affected by such a change. The University will consider your TOP application and you will be notified on the TOP outcome within 6 weeks of the closure of the TOP period.

(c) Subject to the University’s TOP policy, a student is entitled to a maximum of 2 TOP (Restart TOP inclusive) throughout his/her time of study with the University. (d) If your TOP application is successful: (i) the transfer will be effective in the following semester; (ii) there will be no refund for cu previously obtained but which do not form part of the degree profile of and are not transferable to the new programme; (iii) the University will allow the transfer of any credit exemption/credit recognition previously granted to you if these fit the profile of the new programme. Relevant non U/SUSS Core course(s) including retired nonU/SUSS Core major or minor course(s) completed and is found in the major or minor of the TOP Programme will be considered for credit recognition. There will be no refund of fees paid for credit exemptions that are not transferable to the new programme; (iv) you are expected to fulfil all the requirements of the new programme, including

payment of applicable course fees, CGPA and U/SUSS Core requirements, etc. General Studies programme. Students who are reading the GS modular programme may apply for a transfer to the GS degree programme if they meet the admission requirements of the GS degree programme. Deferment 1.51 Applicability and frequency. Deferment is open to all students Subject to the University’s approval, a student in a degree programme may defer his/her studies any number of times provided he/she is able to complete the degree programme within the Page 9 maximum candidature period calculated from the time of his/her admission to the University. The maximum candidature periods are as follows: (a) Full-time students – 6 years (b) Part-time students – 8 years. There is no maximum candidature period for students in the GS degree programme1. 1.6 1.52 Deferment application. If you wish to defer your studies in a particular semester, please submit the online Application for Deferment form to

the University before payment of course fee and commencement of the semester. Each deferment application is for one semester and must be accompanied by a non-refundable fee of S$64.20 (inclusive of GST). Full-time students on work attachment (WA) programme will be auto-deferred for the semester. 1.53 Duration of deferment. If approved, the period of deferment shall be for one semester only. You must resume your studies in the next following semester 1.54 Re-sit examinations. If you have re-sit examination(s) in a particular semester, you should not apply for deferment in that semester. If you do, you will have to repeat the relevant course(s) and pay all applicable fees if you opt to take the same course(s) in the future. Withdrawal from course 1.61 Generally. A student may withdraw from one or more course(s) in a particular semester. A student remains liable to pay the course fee(s) for the withdrawn course(s) and there will be no refund of course fee(s) already paid. All

withdrawals will be reflected in the student’s academic transcript as “W”. “W” will not impact a student’s CGPA. 1.62 Capstone course/Applied project. A student may withdraw from the capstone course/applied project either by withdrawal through the normal withdrawal procedure or be deemed to have withdrawn due to non-submission of the capstone/applied project proposal. A student who has submitted his/her capstone/applied project proposal and would like to withdraw from the course/project has to complete and submit a withdrawal form to the School. No grade will be given and a student will have to re-register for the course/project and pay the full fee. 1.63 Pre-course/Pre-class quiz. To promote active learning and facilitate in-class discussion, students are required to read through the study units for the course and attempt the pre-course/pre-class quizzes before course commencement/face-to-face seminars. You should refer to the course specific announcement posted in

Canvas (http://canvas.sussedusg) for details on the number of quizzes and requirements pertaining to each course. Each pre-course/pre-class quiz is graded and you may attempt the quiz via the registered course Lecture Group (L01) under <Graded Quizzes> tab. You are advised to complete the respective quizzes by the stipulated deadline. If you do not meet the passing criteria for a course’s pre-course quiz (“PCOQ”), the following applies with immediate effect, regardless of when you are officially withdrawn from the course: (a) you will not be allowed to attend any class(es) for the course; and 1 Please note that subsidy from the Ministry of Education is only for 8 years for students enrolled in the degree programme including GS students undertaking the GS degree programme. Page 10 (b) any assignments submitted by you will not be graded. You may repeat the withdrawn course at $0 for the first repeat. For each subsequent repeat, you will be charged an administrative

fee of $117.70 (inclusive of GST) 1.7 1.8 Withdrawal from programme 1.71 Application. To withdraw from a programme and end your studies with the University, you need to submit the online Application for Withdrawal from Programme form. Your student ID card must be returned to the University. You will receive an acknowledgement letter from the University. There will be no refund of course fee(s) A student is deemed to have withdrawn from his/her programme if he/she does not register to read any course for the following semester within the stipulated deadline (see Section 1.12 (b) above) 1.72 Consequences of withdrawal. Please consult your HoP or the Student Support Department of the University before making a decision to withdraw from a programme. When you withdraw from a programme, your registration for all courses at the time of withdrawal will be cancelled. You may re-apply for admission to the University based on the then prevailing admission criteria. The University may, at

its sole discretion, allow you to count any course credits obtained prior to your withdrawal from the University, to your programme of study. Any credit recognition/waiver previously granted will be re-assessed. Cancellation of enrolment by University 1.81 Failure to make academic progress. The University has the right to cancel the enrolment of a student who fails to make academic progress, having regard to all relevant information, including any mitigating circumstances. A student fails to make academic progress when he/she fails to achieve a CGPA rating of at least 2.0 (see Section 1.9 below on Academic Progression Policy) CGPA is not applicable to the Bachelor of General Studies Programme. 1.82 Failure to register and pay for course(s). The University may cancel the enrolment of a student who: (a) fails to register for courses within the stipulated deadline; or (b) registers for the course(s) but fails to pay the course fees and all other required fees or charges within the

stipulated deadline and has not made any application for deferment or withdrawal from programme. 1.83 Indebtedness. The University may cancel the enrolment of a student who has outstanding debt owing to the University, including unpaid course/tuition fee and/or other fees. 1.84 Appeals against cancellation. A student whose enrolment has been cancelled by the University may appeal to be reinstated. The appeal must be submitted to the University, via an application for reinstatement through eServices at the Student Portal, within 14 days of the date of the University’s written notice to the student of the cancellation (“appeal period”). A non-refundable fee of S$21400 (inclusive of GST) must accompany the appeal. If the appeal is successful, a student will be required to pay the administrative fee of S$64.20 (inclusive of GST) for deferment 1.85 Re-admission after cancellation of enrolment. If no appeal is received within the appeal period or if an appeal has been

unsuccessful, a student must go through the admission Page 11 process to gain re-admission to the University. If re-admitted, the University may, at its discretion, allow a student to count any course credits (excluding those of retired and replacement courses) obtained prior to the cancellation of enrolment only if they are relevant and applicable to the programme that he/she has re-applied to study. Any credit recognition/waiver previously granted will be re-assessed. 1.9 Academic progression policy 1.91 University’s policy. Students who do not attain at least a CGPA score of 20 for 2 semesters will face academic termination (“AT”). A student will receive an “Academic Warning” letter from his/her Dean if his/her CGPA falls below 2.0 for the first time The next time his/her CGPA falls below 2.0, he/she will receive an AT letter from the Registrar. Students who are given AT are permitted, only once, to apply to restart their current programme or transfer to another

(replacement) programme (collectively, “Restart Students”). Note: Full-time students may only restart to part-time programmes if they meet the admission requirements of the programmes accepting the restart. All Re-start Students must take a semester off prior to re-starting their current programme or moving into the replacement programme. The “semester off” will not be factored into a Re-start Student’s candidature computation. Students who are given AT will not have access to the Student Portal three months after the release of the semester examination results, but they will be able to communicate with the University via their MyMail account. 1.92 Re-start for non-AT students. Students who are not on AT but have CGPA below 20 may opt to apply to restart their current programme of study or transfer to a replacement programme. Such students must take a semester off prior to re-starting their current programme or moving into the replacement programme. The “semester off”

will not be factored into the students’ candidature computation. 1.93 Credit recognition and waiver on re-start. Re-start Students may transfer credits from previously completed courses (except for retired courses) to their re-start or replacement programmes, subject to a maximum of 60 cu and 10 cu of U/SUSS Core courses, and provided: (a) the group of courses in question match the CP of the re-start or replacement programme; and (b) the CGPA of the group of courses in question is at least 2.0 Re-start Students will be eligible for the credit recognition and waivers that were previously granted to them (except for retired courses) if these are relevant to the restart or replacement programme (except the Bachelor of General Studies programme), subject to the afore-mentioned maximum limit of 60 cu and 10 cu of U/SUSS Core courses. 1.94 Government tuition grant/subsidy. Re-start Students who are eligible for government grant/subsidy will continue to benefit from the government

grant/subsidy. The amount of government tuition grant/subsidy earlier consumed will be taken into account when assessing how much government grant/subsidy you are entitled to receive for your restart programme. The “semester off” will not be factored into the maximum candidature period for government grant/subsidy eligibility. 1.95 Candidature period. A student’s period of candidature commences from the day he/she first enrolled with the University. Re-start Students will not have their period of candidature re-set. Re-start Students who are near the end of the maximum Page 12 candidature period may appeal to remain in their programmes. However, they will not be eligible for the MOE subsidy beyond the maximum candidature period specified in Section 1.51 (see also sections 465(a) and (b) under Section 4 - Money Matters) 1.96 Fee payable. Re-start Students are required to pay a non-refundable fee of S$11770 (inclusive of GST) to apply to re-start their programmes or to

transfer to another programme. This application is subject to the approval of the University and applications received after the stipulated deadline will not be considered. Page 13 Section 2 Academic Matters This section of the Handbook explains the various elements of the academic side of your life at the University. Your School may also provide you with essential information relating to your programme of study, including the detailed arrangements for learning, teaching and assessment, and the rules that govern academic matters. Please refer to these documents regularly 2.1 Assessment and examination 2.11 Assessment Basis. Your academic performance is determined on the basis of 2 assessment components: (a) the OCAS; and (b) the OES. Please refer to the Assessment and Examination Regulations in Section 5.2 All course results are approved by the University’s Examinations and Awards Committee (“EAC”). The University may vary the OCAS and OES requirements from time to

time. 2.12 Grade Point Average (“GPA”). The University uses the GPA system and the Cumulative Grade Point Average (“CGPA”) indicators to track a student’s progress at programme level over the duration of study. It is important that you read through the University’s Graduation Regulations in Section 5.2 so that you are fully aware of the requirements for graduation. 2.13 Mark thresholds for the award of course results. To pass a course, a student must achieve/fulfil: (a) A minimum OCAS of 40 marks out of a total of 100 marks; (b) A minimum OES of 40 marks out of a total of 100 marks; and (c) the compulsory attendance requirements, where applicable (for instance, laboratory sessions) The rank score (“RS”) of a course shall determine the course grade. The RS is computed based on the weighted percentage of OES and OCAS for the course2. 2.14 Threshold for re-sit and repeat. (a) If a student attains an OES of between 15 to 39 and an OCAS of at least 40, he/she will

only re-sit the written examination or re-submit the examinable assignment work during the next examination period for the course. Some courses require mandatory attendance for laboratory sessions as part of the requirements to pass the course. These thresholds are applicable to all courses unless the requirements of a course specifies otherwise. (b) If a student fails to attain an OES of at least 15 or an OCAS of at least 40, then he/she will repeat the entire course. 2 For example, if both the OES and OCAS are equally weighted (i.e 50% each) and a student has obtained an OES and OCAS of 50 and 75 marks respectively, then his/her rank score is RS = 0.5 × OCAS + 05 × OES = 63 (rounded up) With this rank score of 63 marks, then his/her grade will be a B-. Please note that the weighted % of OCAS and OES components in a course is not necessarily a 50:50 rule as in the illustration above. Page 14 2.15 2.16 Automatic withdrawal from course. (a) A student who is absent from an

examination or who does not submit the endof-course assessments (“ECA”) is deemed to have automatically withdrawn from the course. In such an event, the course will not have a grade and hence will not be included in the CGPA computation. It will be denoted by a ‘W’ status on the student’s academic transcript to indicate that the student withdrew from the course during the semester; (b) Following the rules for re-sit and repeat, the outcome of the course will then be either a ‘W + re-sit’ or a ‘W + repeat’; (c) If it is a re-sit category, the student must take the examination or submit a new ECA in the next presenting semester. The University does not limit the number of withdrawals for each student in the 8-year candidature period3. As such, a student may choose to withdraw in the next semester by being absent for the resit examination or not submit the new ECA in the next semester. The outcome of the course in question in the second semester will automatically be

reflected as a “W + repeat”. (d) A student who declines the University’s offer of a re-sit must repeat the course. However, if it is an elective course, the student may choose either to repeat the course or choose another elective course. Assessment for U/C/SUSS Core courses. The assessment bases for specific U/C/SUSS Core courses are in the course materials. There are 2 types of assessment bases for UCore courses: OCAS + OES = 100% OCAS = 100% For some U/C/SUSS Core courses, there is no re-sit option if students withdraw from or fail any component of the UCore courses. A student must repeat the course if it is compulsory or attempt another course. 2.17 Pre-course/Pre-class quiz. To promote active learning and facilitate in-class discussion, students are required to read through the study units for the course and attempt the pre-course/pre-class quizzes before course commencement/face-to-face seminars. You should refer to the course specific announcement posted in Canvas

(http://canvas.sussedusg) for details on the number of quizzes and requirements pertaining to each course. Each pre-course/pre-class quiz is graded and you may attempt the quiz via the registered course Lecture Group (L01) under <Graded Quizzes> tab. You are advised to complete the respective quizzes by the stipulated deadline. If you do not meet the passing criteria for a course’s pre-course quiz (“PCOQ”), the following applies with immediate effect, regardless of when you are officially withdrawn from the course: (a) you will not be allowed to attend any physical face-to-face class(es) for the course; and (b) any assignments submitted by you will not be graded. You may repeat the withdrawn course at $0 for the first repeat. For each subsequent repeat, you will be charged an administrative fee of $117.70 (inclusive of GST) 3 A student may choose to withdraw in the next semester for being absent for the re-sit examination or not to submit the new ECA in the next

semester. The outcome of this course in the second semester will then automatically be a ‘W + repeat’ Page 15 2.2 Challenge Examination (“CEX”) 2.21 2.3 The University CEX allows you to achieve credit recognition in a required subject area and accrediting you for previous academic and/or experiential knowledge in a subject. CEX is applicable to students enrolled from July 2014 intake onwards. Policy information on CEX is available on the University’s website: https://www.sussedusg/part-time-undergraduate/admissions/prequalifications/challenge-examination Challenge Examination Waiver 2.31 CEX waiver policy. CEX waiver exempts a student from the requirement to take CEX for one or more specific courses in a programme if the student meets the University’s criteria for waiver. The award of CEX waiver is at the sole discretion of the University Please see the Graduation Regulations in Section 5.2 The CEX waiver policy may change from time to time. Your eligibility for a

CEX waiver will be assessed at the point of admission. Any change to the CEX waiver policy will only be applicable to students who are admitted to the University on or after the effective date of the change (“Implementation Date”) and will not be applied retrospectively to students admitted prior to the Implementation Date. 2.32 Applicability. Availability of CEX waiver will be given to selected undergraduate programmes at the discretion of the University. 2.33 Maximum CEX waiver allowed. A maximum of up to 20 cu of Level 1 courses may be granted CEX waiver. 2.34 General principles. The award of CEX waiver is governed by the following principles: 2.35 (a) The qualification of the academic study prior to admission to the University (“prior study”) is at least a diploma from a recognised local institution and must be relevant to the programme of study at the University. The diploma graduating GPA must be at least 3.5 (polytechnic) or 4375 (NIE); and (b) the prior study

must be academic in nature; have an established syllabus and well-structured course work, and its courses were assessed through controlled examinations. Qualifications based solely upon work experience are not within the scope of the CEX waiver policy. However, this does not exclude courses, which, while primarily academic in nature, have a practical element, particularly if this element is assessed and requires the application of theory to practice. Application and appeal for CEX waiver. (a) You do not need to apply for CEX waiver as your qualification(s) will be assessed by the University at point of admission. (b) There is no appeal if CEX waiver is not granted. 2.4 Waivers from Common/SUSS Core Unrestricted Electives for full-time students 2.41 “A” level students and polytechnic applicants who are admitted to the University’s fulltime programmes will be granted waivers of up to 10 cu in the Unrestricted Electives of SUSS Core. Students with an ‘A” grade in a relevant

H2 content subject will be granted a waiver from a corresponding 5 cu Common Core elective in one of the following areas: Page 16 - Science Mathematics Humanities & Social Science Arts Economics and Management “A” level students may be granted waivers of up to 10 cu of Common Core/SUSS Core Unrestricted Electives in any one or two areas. 2.42 Diploma holders with a polytechnic CGPA of at least 3.5 will be granted a 10 cu waiver (i.e two 5 cu Common Core/SUSS Core Unrestricted Electives) in the area that is most related to their respective diplomas. 2.43 Single Major students are required to take one 5 cu Major course with part-time students for each 5 cu Common Core/SUSS Core Unrestricted Elective that has been waived. Page 17 Section 3 Study Skills, Resources and Support 3.1 Study skills and support 3.11 Independent learning. (a) you are expected to take responsibility for your own learning and to make effective use of all the resources at your disposal to

develop your subject knowledge and your critical and analytical skills; (b) the most important aspect of a university education is to teach you to think for yourself. This implies learning where to find information and, in particular, how to apply the literature of your subject effectively; (c) your School will provide guidance on the specific skills required for your particular subject. This guidance may be delivered during your normal classes or via course guides or online sessions; (d) the University’s Teaching and Learning Centre will provide guidance on generic study skills such as “Successful Learning at SUSS” and “Academic Integrity” through specially prepared workshops and e-modules every semester; and (e) you are encouraged to maintain 6 to 8 hours of self-study per course on a weekly basis. Self-study is not just about reading books With the University’s structured package books, you will learn from a combination of materials which include, but not limited

to printed materials, videos, audio programmes, computer-based materials depending on the needs of the course. 3.12 Generic skills. In addition to subject-specific skills, all students are offered opportunities to develop a range of generic skills such as self-motivation, problem solving, making presentations, working within a team towards a common goal, etc. These will not only improve your academic performance but also enhance your job prospects. 3.13 Course materials. The types of course materials a student needs may vary from one course to another. You should refer to the set of specially written study units and workbooks which provide the essential study information you require, such as: 3.14 (a) some courses may require textbooks. Textbooks are packaged with other course materials. In some instances, you may be required to purchase additional reference materials separately. Please refer to the announcements on the Student Portal, and (b) recommended reading which is

optional and varies from course to course. Whilst you are not expected to read all the recommended texts, you may use some of them to help in solving difficult questions or pursue a special interest. These books are available at the SIM Tay Eng Soon Library. You may like to purchase some of the recommended books. Course guide. With the help of the course guide for each course, you will be able to pace your learning accordingly. The course calendar indicates the number of assignments involved in the course and the respective assignment submission dates. Page 18 3.2 3.15 E-learning and specialised software. Some courses provide e-learning materials which are posted on Canvas. These are useful learning tools and form an important component of your self-study. Some courses may utilise specialised laboratory or other software. Students may access such software on the University’s servers via VPN connections. Students are expected to have their own internet access in order to

utilise these e-learning and other online materials and facilities. 3.16 Self-help study groups. Students are encouraged to set up meetings and discussion groups amongst themselves. A successful study group requires a facilitator/coordinator to coordinate the meeting place, time, agenda etc. Many students find self-help study groups beneficial in that they add new insights to their studies and hence broaden their learning experiences. 3.17 Resit Support Service (with lectures and tutorials). Students who wish to attend classes for resit course may apply for resit support service during the course offer period. Approval for resit support service is subject to course quota availability. The application form is available at the Student Portal and the fee charged would be 90% of the course fee inclusive of $100 resit fee (and subject to prevailing GST). This support service is not applicable for courses which have been retired or replaced with other courses. Library services 3.21

University Library. Students will find a growing number of licensed and open access electronic resources for their reference use in assignments and projects as well as various online library services. 3.22 Scholarly resources. You may locate journal articles, book chapters and other electronic resources by conducting a search on the Library Portal. You may also browse individual journals and find databases and collections by subject, including book collections. 3.23 Library login. You will need to sign in to your library account with your University login ID and password to access licensed resources as well as to carry out more complete searches, save and manage your search results, search queries and alerts, and personalise your search results. 3.24 Ask The Library services. You can ask library staff reference questions and request research assistance by submitting them via email to ask@suss.libanswerscom or through the online form. You may also make an appointment to meet with

a librarian for a consultation on using library resources. Students may also refer to our knowledge base of frequently asked questions. 3.25 Related services. Ask The Library services are complemented by other library services You may: 3.26 (a) attend workshops conducted by the University Library or in collaboration with the Teaching and Learning Centre and Schools to develop your information literacy and research skills; (b) consult research guides for key resources in your field of study, to find out how to do library research and more; and (c) download library tools such as the Browzine app which will enable you to read and monitor library journals from your smartphone or tablet. An overview of BrowZine can be found in this research guide. Library news. Students are encouraged to subscribe to the University Library’s blog SUSS It Out! to stay updated on library news and information. Page 19 3.27 3.3 SIM Library. Students enrolled in degree and diploma programmes

are also provided with student membership to the Singapore Institute of Management’s Tay Eng Soon Library located at Block A, Level 2. You may borrow print books, media items, notebook PCs and other devices, book group study rooms as well as make use of their on-site library services and facilities. Your Student Card serves as your SIM Library membership card and you will require a different set of login credentials to sign in to the SIM Library Portal: PI number and Date of Birth (DDMMYYYY). FTUG students issued with Tertiary Student Concession Cards will not be able to use the self-checkout stations and will need to approach the Library counter when borrowing books. Class sessions and projects Apart from self-study and submitting assignments, regular lectures, tutorials, seminars and laboratories enable you to have more in-depth discussion with your instructors and fellow students. You can refer to the Student Portal, e-Services to view your course timetable for a semester which

is available from mid-January and mid-July. Classes that fall on public holidays and the University’s shutdown days will typically be re-scheduled to the immediate weekend, usually on either Saturday or Sunday between 8.30am and 1000pm subject to no timetable clashes. A class will be deemed as cancelled if the associate fails to show up thirty minutes after the session is due to begin. 3.31 Lectures. Lectures are organised to help students focus on key learning points They also allow you to interact with students from other tutorial groups. 3.32 Tutorials. These provide the chance for you to clarify issues and problems on course work and assignments with your instructor. They also allow you to interact and learn together with other students. 3.33 Seminars. Seminars are flexible sessions that aim to facilitate learning – not just from the seminar instructor but also among students. They are structured around various class activities, which may include class discussions,

presentations, case studies, computer exercises and so on. Seminars focus on interactive and active learning 3.34 Laboratories. These sessions provide a hands-on opportunity for you and to seek clarifications with your instructors on the learning equipment which you have learned in class. The sessions aim to provide a better understanding of your courses from a practical approach. 3.35 Capstone/Applied projects. Students undertaking capstone/applied projects should meet with their respective supervisors in the first week of the semester to agree on a timetable of meetings and assignments. The supervisor will provide guidance to the student at regular meetings and define the responsibilities of the student and goals of the Capstone project, monitor progress toward those goals, review drafts of the student’s work and provide direction and assistance where needed. 3.36 Online sessions. Online or self-study sessions complement the face-to-face lecture, tutorial or seminar. It

allows you to learn and contribute meaningful discussions via instructor-facilitated online forums and virtual classroom systems. 3.37 Course Groupings. You are assigned to specific groupings based on your course combination and the availability of instructors. Due to the large number of students and the many combinations of courses taken by students, the University will not be able to accommodate requests to change the allocated groupings. You must stay in your allocated group throughout the semester or academic year. Students are not allowed to attend any other groups that have not been allocated to them. Page 20 3.4 3.38 Attendance. Class attendance helps students to benefit from class activities and learn from their instructors and fellow students but is not compulsory unless otherwise stated by the course or if you are an international student. Some courses may have mandatory laboratory requirements. Failure to attend the mandatory laboratory session(s) may lead to a

“Fail” grade for the course. In addition to scheduled laboratory sessions, there may be drop-in laboratory sessions. There will not be any make-up for lessons/sessions that you have missed. 3.39 Language of instruction. Unless specified otherwise, English shall be the language used for and in all tutorials, lectures, materials, counselling, examinations, assessments and administration in the University. Reports, assignments and essays Written assignments form part of your workload. Beware of plagiarism and ensure that all your sources are correctly referenced. 3.5 Support and counselling If you have difficulties that might affect your studies, you should consult your course instructor or HoP or the Student Support Department of the University. The University also runs a counselling centre to assist students on non-academic issues. 3.6 C-three (Counselling & Care Corner) 3.61 Why C-three? University life can be fun and exciting, but it can also present many stressful

moments for those who have left school for many years. Managing the demands of work, family and studies can create a high level of anxiety and stress. Help is available for students to tap on. 3.62 C-three services. C-three offers a safe and conducive environment for students with personal challenges to seek help and guidance from professional counselling psychologists and counsellors. Counselling services are offered to all students at no cost regardless of age, race, language, or religion. C-three is located at: SIM Block A Level 3 Room 3.05B Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 8:30 am to 5:30 pm Wednesday: 8:30 am to 8:00 pm Closed on Saturday, Sunday, and Public Holidays. You may request for an appointment via: (a) (b) (c) (d) 3.63 telephone number 6248 1600; email: counsellingservices@suss.edusg; the Student Portal; or walk-in (subject to the availability of the psychologist/counsellor) Confidentiality and privacy. Information shared during counselling sessions will not be

released to anyone without the written consent of the student unless required by law or to prevent imminent danger to the student and/or others. Page 21 3.7 Student records 3.71 Personal identifier number. Your personal identifier (“PI”) number is the University’s means of finding your records in the University’s system. Your PI will stay with you throughout your studies with the University. You should always quote it in verbal or written communication with the University. 3.72 Changing your name. If you change your name, you must inform the University in writing and provide the appropriate documentary evidence in the form of a deed poll or letter of declaration signed by a solicitor or a Justice of Peace or your new identification card. Award certificates will be issued only in the name that you hold at the time of the award and may be different from the name in the academic transcripts. 3.73 Changing your address or contact telephone number(s). You may update any

change of address or contact telephone number(s) online via the Student Portal at http://www.sussedusg You should also place a re-direction order with the post office to avoid missing any correspondence from the University. The University will not accept responsibility for your non-receipt of correspondence or materials. The University accepts only one local mailing address per student. 3.74 Confirmation of student status. The University can provide you with an official confirmation of your status as a registered student. Requests should be sent via your MyMail account, and addressed to the Student Support Department at email address: students@suss.edusg 3.75 Access to student record. 3.76 (a) you can access your electronic records at the Student Portal via www.sussedusg with your University login ID and password; (b) the University is committed to the principles of data protection and follows best practices in handling the information it holds. All personal information is

held in secured computer and manual files. Your student record is made available only to those directly concerned, either academically or administratively, with your progress as a student; and (c) If you have been sponsored to read a programme, the University may release your academic results directly to your sponsor without seeking your permission. Academic transcripts. Academic transcripts are records of all the courses taken and the grades obtained by you. Your transcript will also include information on: (a) failed and withdrawn courses; (b) total credit exemption/waiver granted (if any); (c) total credit recognition granted (if any); and (d) total cu of courses taken at approved institutions (if any). Academic transcript will be issued to conferred graduates who meet the graduation requirements between three to four months after the release of the final semester results. Pending the University’s issue of the official transcripts, graduating students can request for

and print interim transcripts via the Student e-Services. The interim transcript is designed to show similar information as the official transcript, except for degree conferment details (i.e conferment date and degree classification, if applicable) Page 22 The interim transcript is used primarily for reference to attest to the completion of programme and is available only to graduating students until the official transcript is issued. There is no charge for the interim transcript 3.8 Communication via MyMail account 3.81 MyMail account. Each student is given a MyMail email account All communication with the University faculty and staff must be conducted via your MyMail account and should include your name at the time of registration, your PI number, and the programme that you are currently enrolled in or has completed with the University. The use of your MyMail account is governed by the University’s Administrative Policy on Email (Student/Staff/Associate/Alumni). You may read

the policy here: https://heartbeat.simedusg/policies-and-procedures/UniSIM/Campus-ITServices/Policies/Administrative%20Policy%20for%20Emailpdf 3.82 First point of contact. The Student Support Department and Technical Helpdesk are a student’s first point-of-contact with the University on enquiries related to administrative matters and technical assistance respectively. The contact options and operating hours are as follows: Student Support Department (a) Student Hotline: 6248-9111 (Option 1) (b) Walk-in Counter Service5e (c) Email: students@suss.edusg Mondays – Fridays : 8:30 am – 7:30pm Saturdays : 9:00 am – 1:00pm Closed on Sundays & Public Holidays & the University’s shutdown days Technical Helpdesk (a) Student Hotline: 6248-9111 (Option 2) (b) Email: lssupport@suss.edusg Mondays – Fridays: 8:30 am – 7:30pm Saturdays : 9:00 am – 1:00pm 3.83 Communication from the University to students. The University uses one or more of the following channels to

communicate with students: (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) Telephone calls Student Portal Email SMSes Snail mail and/or Canvas Page 23 3.9 Facilities, equipment and services 3.91 Class venues. Your classes, including laboratory sessions may be held at one or more of the following premises: (a) SIM HQ (461 Clementi Road); (b) such other venues as may be designated by the University from time to time. 3.92 Car parks. Paid parking at the University is available to all students Students are to comply with car park regulations. 3.93 Smoking. The University is a smoke-free campus Students who violate this policy shall be subject to disciplinary action according to the University’s disciplinary procedures (see Section 5.1, Part C) 3.94 Laboratory facilities. During specific tutorials/seminars, students may access the laboratory facilities on University campus and other designated locations. These facilities provide a comprehensive infrastructure to support you in your coursework.

3.95 Orientation, seminars and briefings. Upon acceptance of the University’s offer for admission, you will be invited to attend an orientation which may include seminars/briefings held in the month of January and July depending on your time of admission. The orientation session provides a platform for you to meet with the University’s academic and/or administrative staff. Thereafter, the University may organize other briefings/seminars for students from time to time and students will be notified of such events. 3.96 Communication with Instructors. You may use the email contact of your instructors to discuss matters concerning your academic studies. 3.97 Students with disabilities. A wide range of special services is available to support students with disabilities. These include advice and/or information on the course(s) chosen and course materials in alternative forms and classroom logistical support, where appropriate. It may be possible for students with disabilities to

take their examinations away from the designated examination venues. The University will conduct off-site examinations should a situation warrant it – e.g a critical medical condition certified by a medical professional that prevents a student from taking the examination under usual conditions. The University encourages students, regardless of individual circumstances, to inform the University as early as possible if they need additional help. A written request supported by valid documents is required for the University to make available the special services or arrangements. 3.98 Online portals. The various online platforms for students to access academic and administrative information are: (a) the University Student Portal – you can login to the University’s Student Portal at http://www.sussedusg General announcements, administrative forms, FAQs on Canvas, specific programme information and access to Canvas are found on this portal; (b) Canvas – Canvas is a user-friendly

web-based learning management system that supports a flexible teaching and learning environment. It facilitates selfpaced learning with tools for online content sharing, course management (ie course materials), assessment management (i.e continuous assessments), and online collaboration and communication. It also supports online marking Students are required to submit their assignments via ‘Turnitin’ in Canvas. Marked assignments will be returned to students via this platform. Instructors will also supplement classroom experience with online course materials, conduct online discussions and manage projects to enhance instructorstudent interaction. You are strongly encouraged to access Canvas regularly Page 24 Section 4 Money Matters 4.1 Types of fees Course/Tuition fees View for full-time students View for part-time students View for full-time students View for part-time students Miscellaneous fees 4.2 Payment methods The University accepts payment by cash, NETS, cheque and

selected credit cards. For online payment, eNETS and credit card (VISA and MasterCard) are acceptable. Cheque payments should be made payable to “Singapore University of Social Sciences”. The University will issue receipts for all payments received. 4.3 Responsibility for fees A student remains ultimately liable to the University in respect of any fees payable, notwithstanding that the student has a sponsor who has undertaken to pay any fees due. 4.4 4.5 Late payment or non-payment 4.41 Regulations. The University’s procedures for dealing with late or non-payment of fees are set out in the Student Fee Regulations (see Section 5.2) If you know that a payment will be late or if you encounter difficulties over payment of your fees, please contact the University’s Student Support Department promptly. Whenever possible, a realistic payment plan will be agreed with you. If you experience on-going financial hardship, please contact the Student Support Department for advice. You

may also wish to inform your HoP or personal tutor, particularly if concerns about financial matters are affecting your studies. 4.42 Debts to the University. Students with any kind of debts to the University will not be able to view their examination results for the prior semester and/or course offers for the new semester until their debts have been cleared. In the meantime, a student will not be able to qualify for course credit or any other award. Debts may include unreturned home kits, equipment on loan, set books on loan and other loan items from the University. The University may also exercise the right to withhold course results, academic references, transcripts and certificates and to impose a late fee penalty of 5% calculated on the outstanding amount and cancel your student registration. Refunds It is the policy of the University not to refund fees. 4.6 Government tuition grant/subsidy Government tuition grants are available for full-time students who meet the

eligibility criteria. Part-time students will receive government subsidy if they are eligible. Page 25 4.61 4.62 Eligibility. (a) all existing students enrolled in undergraduate degree programmes who are Singapore citizens or Singapore permanent residents or international students are eligible for the government tuition grant/subsidy, provided he/she has not previously received government sponsorship or subsidy for a first degree (local or overseas), e.g, first degree from any of the local autonomous universities or an overseas university funded by government scholarship/bursary; (b) part-time students must meet the age and work experience criteria in order to qualify for government subsidy. A part-time student who is sponsored by his/her company or employed in a job role/sector related to his/her programme of study may receive exemption from the eligibility criteria. There will be no retrospective claim for government tuition grant/subsidy. Documentary proof or declaration

is required for all the above criteria; (c) Post-graduate, Graduate Diploma, Diploma and Certificate programmes are not eligible for the government tuition grant/subsidy; (d) for remaining students in the GS modular programme who accumulate enough cu to be awarded a Degree, no retrospective claim of government subsidy is allowed; and (e) eligible students who are Singapore Citizens and 40 years or older will also enjoy the SkillsFuture Mid-Career Enhanced subsidy. Government Tuition Grant/Subsidy coverage. The government tuition grant/subsidy covers course fee for new and repeat courses. It does not cover: (a) re-sit fees; (b) extra courses taken beyond the requirements for the undergraduate degree programme; (c) auxiliary charges like administrative fees (e.g Add/Drop course application, deferment, transfer of programme, examination appeal, etc.), overseas travel expenses, etc.; (d) any penalty charges (e.g late payment fee); and (e) any other miscellaneous fees. 4.63

Changes in eligibility status. If you were not eligible for the government tuition grant/subsidy upon admission to the University, but subsequently fulfil the eligibility criteria, you will be eligible for the government tuition grant/subsidy from the next academic semester, upon your written notification with documentary proof to the University. 4.64 Number of cu subsidised. The government will provide the tuition grant/subsidy for a maximum of cu as follows: (a) Full-time students: (i) 200 registered cu over a maximum 6-year candidature period; and (ii) the government tuition grant cut-off will be either the maximum candidature period, or upon consuming the maximum claimable registered cu, whichever is the earlier to occur. Page 26 Obligations. There is no requirement for students who are Singapore Citizens to repay the tuition grant to the MOE or the University; or to undertake a service bond. However, the cu of withdrawn course(s) will be counted towards the claimable

registered cu allocated to you. In the case of your re-enrolment with the University, the amount of tuition grant consumed by you during your previous candidature will be taken into account when assessing your tuition grant entitlement for the 6 years calculated from the start of the semester wherein you first enjoyed the tuition grant. All non-Singaporean students (including Singapore Permanent Residents and international students) who receive the government grant under the tuition grant scheme are contractually obliged, under the terms of tuition grant agreement, to work in a Singapore entity for three (3) years upon graduation. (b) Part Time Students: (i) (ii) 200 registered cu over a maximum 8-year candidature period for an honours or direct honours degree; or 160 registered cu over a maximum 8-year candidature period for a basic degree; and (iii) the government subsidy cut-off point will be either the maximum candidature period, or upon consuming the maximum claimable

registered cu, whichever is the earlier to occur 4 . CEX waiver/waiver from SUSS Core/credit recognition counts towards the cap for subsidised cu5. Obligations. There is no requirement to repay the government subsidy to the MOE or the University; or to undertake a service bond. However, the cu of withdrawn course(s) will be counted towards the claimable registered cu allocated to you6. In the case of your re-enrolment with the University, the amount of government funding that consumed had been for your previous candidature will be taken into account when assessing your government subsidy entitlement for the 8 years calculated from the start of the semester wherein you first enjoyed the subsidy. 4.65 4.66 Transfer/re-admission of university students. (a) For SUSS full time programmes – if you are transferring from a full-time degree programme from an autonomous university to the University, the amount of tuition grant earlier consumed will be taken into account when assessing your

tuition grant entitlement subject to your meeting the applicable eligibility criteria. (b) For SUSS part time programmes - If you are transferring from a full-time degree programme from an autonomous university to the University, you will be eligible to receive the full government subsidy subject to satisfying the criteria listed in Section 4.61 above If you are transferring from a part-time degree programme from an autonomous university to the University, the amount of government funding earlier consumed will be taken into account when assessing your government subsidy entitlement subject to your meeting the criteria listed in Section 4.61 Changes to programme of studies. If you apply for a transfer from one basic degree programme to another basic programme, or apply for a transfer from an honours Page 27 programme to a basic degree programme, the amount of government tuition grant/subsidy earlier consumed will be taken into account when assessing your government tuition

grant/subsidy entitlement for your new programme. 4.67 4.7 Other sponsorships or concessionary fees. All students receiving the University’s sponsorship will be entitled to the government tuition grant/subsidy, subject to meeting the criteria for the government tuition grant/subsidy. Students who do not wish to take the government tuition grant/subsidy shall inform the University in writing. Financial Aid The University offers a range of financial aid for eligible students: Full-time students Part-time students 4.8 View View Miscellaneous Fees Full-time students are required to pay miscellaneous fees. The miscellaneous fees help to defray the costs of providing CLASS copyright licensing fees, student insurance and IT-related services which are not covered by tuition fee and grant. These fees are annually recurring, mandatory, non-refundable, and payable at the beginning of each academic year (that is, July of each year). Page 28 Section 5 Rules and Regulations When you

enrol with the University, you agree to be bound by all the University’s rules and regulations. This section sets out the main regulations of a general nature applicable to students. The Registrar’s Office is responsible for maintaining these and you should periodically check this Handbook for updates. Life outside the classroom is an integral part of the educational process. You are advised to have a working knowledge of the requirements of certain Singapore legislation that may be relevant to you or your activities both on and outside campus, including Personal Data Protection Act 2012, Computer Misuse and Cybersecurity Act (Cap. 50A); Smoking (Prohibited in Certain Places) Act (Cap310) and Undesirable Publications Act (Cap. 338) Law and regulations may change from time to time, and you will be expected to comply with those in force at any given time. Listed below are various legislation and regulations of relevance to students 5.1 Policies and Procedures Part A Personal Data

Protection 1. You may access the University’s Privacy Policy here: https://www.sussedusg/docs/defaultsource/contentdoc/cits/dataprotectionpolicypdf 2. The Personal Data Protection Act 2012 (“PDPA”) imposes strict conditions on how personal data may be collected, used, stored and disclosed. It also gives the people who are the subjects of such data the right of access to their data held by an organisation or the person who collected the data. 3. You are personally responsible for complying with the provisions of the PDPA if you collect and/or keep personal data of any kind (whether in soft copy or paper records) on behalf of a club, society or publication, or for any other purpose (such as in connection with the organising of events and seminars). 4. You will observe the University’s standard operating procedures for the collection, use and handling of personal data which can be accessed here: [insert link to SOP] 5. You are reminded that the assessments (Continuous and

Examinable) submitted by you to the University must not contain your personal data such as NRIC, home address and mobile number. Page 29 Part B Personal Representation to the Media 1. It is recognised that from time-to-time, students may be approached by the media on topics related to their personal interests or non-work related activities. Students may participate in such interviews in their personal capacity. 2. Students are free to communicate with and through media (including digital and social media such as Stomp and Facebook) without the approval of the University only when the communication is solely in the student’s personal capacity and is an expression of the student’s personal opinion which has no bearing on, prejudice or implications to the University and the staff/students/alumni/associates of the University. 3. Students are encouraged to use media (including digital and social media) in a constructive and responsible manner. Media and public platforms should

not be used to raise concerns and grievances relating to studies or University affairs. Students who have concerns and grievances to raise should make use of established and formal channels through our Student Support Department at students@suss.edusg and as specified in this Handbook 4. Students who wish to start a social media site that is related to or uses the name of the University must obtain the prior approval of the University in writing through the Student Support Department at students@suss.edusg 5. Students should not engage in communication that is offensive, vulgar, distasteful, sexually suggestive, seditious, or libellous. All logos, content and photos belonging to and/or in connection with the University may only be used with the prior approval of the University in writing. Students are reminded not to post confidential and/or proprietary information belonging to or in the possession of the University, its faculty, students, alumni or employees and to observe all

applicable legislation and regulation pertaining to personal data protection and intellectual property rights. 6. In the event that students breach this policy or cause embarrassment or damage to the university in any way, the university reserves the right to take appropriate disciplinary and/or legal action against the students concerned. Page 30 Part C Smoking Restriction Policy 1. With effect from 1 October 2017, the Smoking (Prohibition in Certain Places) Act prohibits smoking in any area within the compounds of universities except in university-designated smoking areas. 2. The University implements a ‘3-Strike’ policy when students are caught smoking in a nondesignated smoking area, regardless of the age of the student. First offence: Second offence: Third offence and beyond:  Verbal warning and recording of student’s name, PI number and contact details  Optional coaching and counselling services for students who wish to improve their well-being by

quitting smoking.  Verbal warning and recording of student’s name, PI number and contact details  Mandatory coaching and counselling services for students who wish to improve their well-being by quitting smoking.  Submission of student’s details to the Health Promotion Board (HPB), and referral to HPB for their smoking cessation programmes.  Student will be subject to disciplinary action by the University. Part D Policy on Drug-Related Offences 1. Drug abuse is a more serious offence. 2. Students caught in possession of or taking drugs, whether on or outside of the University’s campus, will be referred to the Central Narcotics Bureau (CNB) for appropriate sanction(s). These students will also be subject to disciplinary action and risk expulsion from the University. 3. Students who suspect a fellow student of taking drugs should call the CNB Hotline at 18003256666. Page 31 Part E Student Grievance Procedure 1. Introduction. 1.1 The objective of

these grievance procedures is to provide students with a fair and expeditious way to resolve a claimed grievance through the use of informal communication and, if necessary, formal grievance review. 1.2 Grievances may include issues of conduct in classrooms, School facilities, projects or disputes arising from supervisory relations or interpretation of School policy or procedure. 1.3 Complaints that are not covered by this procedure include: 1.31 appeals under the Examination and Assessment Regulations, which shall follow the process set out in paragraph 4.18 of Part G (Student Disciplinary Regulations) in this Section 5.1; and 1.32 complaints involving sexual misconduct, which shall follow the process set out in part F in this Section 5.1 1.4 Students may raise grievances jointly. 2. Informal resolution 2.1 A student shall, in the first instance, raise the grievance with the Student Support Department of the University within 14 working days of any occurrence giving rise

to the grievance. 2.2 The Student Support Department shall arrange for an administrative officer and a representative from the student’s School, or an administrative department, to attend meeting(s) with the student to resolve the grievance. 3. The formal stage – Grievance Review Panel 3.1 If the grievance is not resolved informally within 14 working days after the student first contacted the Student Support Department, the student may request for a formal review by the University’s Grievance Review Panel (“GRP”). The student can do so by submitting to Manager, Student Support Department, a written request within 14 working days of the first informal resolution meeting. 3.2 The written request should state the grievance, describe the facts and supporting evidence, indicate what redress the student seeks and provide a brief chronology of the attempts to resolve the grievance. 3.3 Upon receiving such a written request, the Manager, Student Support Department, shall

promptly convene the GRP to hear the grievance. The GPR reports to OSAR and shall comprise: 3.31 3.32 Manager, Student Support Department as Chairperson of the GRP; and Two representatives nominated by the Chairman of SDG. 3.4 The GRP shall meet within 14 working days of receipt of the written request by the Manager, Student Support Department. The student and respondent (if any) shall attend the meeting The GRP may request the presence of such other persons as it deems appropriate for the purpose of ascertaining the facts and evidence in the case. 3.5 The decision of the GRP shall be based solely on the evidence presented and testimony heard at the formal hearing. The decision of the GRP shall be determined by majority vote The GRP shall promptly communicate its decision and any recommendations to all interested parties for appropriate action. The student will be provided a written statement of the GRP’s decision Page 32 The decision of the GRP shall be conclusive and

binding on the student and all other parties involved. 4. Confidentiality If information is to be kept confidential, the student should make this clear to the person to whom a grievance is made. Students should understand that in exceptional circumstances it may be difficult for confidentiality to be respected, for instance where a criminal offence has been disclosed. The University will inform the student prior to any such disclosures Students should also understand that in some circumstances the demand for confidentiality may make it difficult for the University to assist them with their grievance. Page 33 Part F Sexual Misconduct Complaints Resolution Procedures 1. Application and Purpose 1.1 The purpose of these procedures is to: 1.11 give effect to the University’s Sexual Misconduct Policy 2019 (the “Policy”) as it relates to complaints made by or about students and complaints made by applicants; 1.12 provide how complaints within the scope of these procedures

may be raised and how they will be assessed and resolved, where appropriate; and 1.13 prescribe the manner in which the University will conduct investigations where required. 1.2 You may access the Policy here. All terms of reference used in these procedures have the same meaning ascribed to them in the Policy unless the context requires otherwise. 1.3 Complaints of sexual misconduct against University faculty, staff, affiliate and non-affiliates will be investigated and resolved using the applicable procedures in the University’s staff and faculty handbooks. 2. General 2.1 The Student Support Department is responsible for handling complaints made by or about students alleging sexual misconduct. 2.2 All complaints will be handled in a prompt, fair and impartial manner. The process described here is the University’s internal process to determine whether the Policy was violated and is not a court system. As such, the University’s process does not use the same rules of

procedure and evidence as those used by courts or law enforcement. 2.3 A person who has experienced sexual misconduct or any other crime has the right to simultaneously file and pursue a criminal complaint with law enforcement and a complaint with the University if they choose, and to be assisted by the University in notifying law enforcement authorities if they choose, or to decline to notify such authorities. Parties may also have options to file civil actions in court 2.4 As allegations of sexual misconduct can sometimes raise challenging new issues, the University reserves the right to take reasonable actions to address those issues in a manner consistent with the spirit of the Policy and these procedures, while preserving fairness for both parties and maintaining the integrity of the resolution process. Case resolution timeline 2.5 Though the University strives to resolve all cases in a prompt and timely manner, the timeline varies based on the circumstances of the case.

Additionally, the timeline for a case may be affected by breaks in the academic calendar, availability of the parties and witnesses (including due to leave of absence), scope of the investigation, need for interim actions, and unforeseen or exigent circumstances. The parties will be periodically updated on the status of their case In cases where there is a simultaneous law enforcement investigation, the University may need to temporarily delay its investigation while law enforcement gathers evidence. However, the University may proceed with its investigation and resolution of a complaint during any law enforcement investigation if the University determines that it is in the interest of the University community to do so. Page 34 Standard of proof 2.6 The University uses the “balance of probabilities” standard in investigations of complaints alleging sexual misconduct and any related violations. This means that the investigation determines whether it is more likely than not

that a violation of the Policy occurred. Support Person 2.7 A support person is an individual who can be present to provide support to a complainant or respondent throughout an investigation and/or sanctioning process. Complainants and respondents may be accompanied by one support person throughout the investigation and any sanctioning process, provided that the involvement of the support person does not result in an undue delay of the process, as determined by the University in its sole discretion. It is the responsibility of each party to coordinate scheduling with their support person for any meetings. A support person may not speak, write, or otherwise communicate with an investigator, sanctioning panel member or appeal reviewer on behalf of the complainant or respondent. Support persons may not engage in behaviour or advocacy that harasses, abuses, or intimidates either party, a witness, or individuals involved in resolving the complaint. Support persons who do not abide by

these guidelines will be excluded from the process. 2.8 The support person may be any person of the party’s choosing. A support person can be a lawyer if the complaint involves sexual misconduct that constitutes a criminal offence. A support person may not also serve as a witness in the same matter. Further, the support person is still limited to the supportive and non-participatory role described above. A representative from the University’s Legal Department may attend any proceeding where a lawyer serving as a support person is present. 3. Informal Action 3.1 By student Where appropriate, students should seek to resolve issues informally by directly approaching the person they believe is responsible for the issue (either on their own or with another person as a support person), and” 3.11 telling them what the issue is; 3.12 asking them to stop or to behave differently; and 3.13 where appropriate, keeping a written record of this action. 3.2 This paragraph 3 does

not apply to complaints concerning alleged criminal conduct, including sexual assault. 4. Formal Resolution 4.1 Students who are unable to resolve a problem or concern over alleged sexual misconduct through informal action, or consider informal action inappropriate, can make a complaint by contacting the Student Support Officer7. 4.2 If any person other than the Student Support Officer receives or otherwise becomes aware of a complaint on behalf of a student, they must refer the complaint to the Student Support Officer. 4.3 The University’s complaint resolution process should commence within ten (10) working days of a complaint being lodged. A Student Support Officer is defined in the University’s Sexual Misconduct Policy as a specialist member of staff within the Student Support Department who has been designated to handle disclosures or complaints by persons who may have experienced an incident of sexual misconduct. 7 Page 35 4.4 Complainants are not required to

put their complaint in writing in the first instance. However, a written complaint will be required if an investigation is needed. 5. Participation Process 5.1 The University invites complainants and witnesses to participate fully in the complaint resolution process. In order for the University to investigate a complaint and/or enable a respondent to fully respond to the allegations, most situations will require the complainant’s participation and that their identity be disclosed to the respondent. If a complainant decides not to participate, but wants disciplinary action to be taken, the University will determine whether it is possible to move forward with a case without the participation of the complainant. In some cases, it will not be possible for disciplinary action to be taken without the participation of the complainant. 5.2 When individuals report allegations of sexual misconduct to the University and do not consent to the disclosure of their names and/or do not

disclose the identity of the alleged offenders or identifiable information about the alleged offenders, the University’s ability to respond to the complaints may be limited. In cases where an individual reporting sexual misconduct requests anonymity or does not wish to proceed with an investigation, the University will attempt to honour that request but, in some cases, the Student Support Officer may determine that the University needs to proceed with an investigation. In such cases, the University will not compel an individual to participate. The Student Support Officer will consider the following factors in reaching a determination on whether to proceed: 5.21 the totality of the known circumstances; 5.22 the nature and scope of the alleged conduct, including whether the reported behaviour involves the use of a weapon; 5.23 the respective ages and roles of the complainant and respondent; 5.24 the risk posed to any individual or to the University community by not proceeding,

including the risk of additional violence; 5.25 whether there have been other reports of other prohibited conduct or other misconduct by the respondent; 5.26 whether the report reveals a pattern of misconduct (e.g, via illicit use of drugs or alcohol) at a given location or by a particular group; 5.27 the complainant’s interest in the University’s not pursuing an investigation or disciplinary action and the impact of such actions on the complainant; 5.28 whether the University possesses other means to obtain relevant evidence; 5.29 fairness considerations for both the complainant and the respondent; 5.210 the University’s obligation to provide a safe and non-discriminatory environment; and 5.211 any other available and relevant information 5.3 The University invites respondents to participate fully in all aspects of the complaint resolution process. If a respondent elects not to participate in any part of the process, the University may proceed without the

respondent’s participation. Respondents will be held accountable for any outcomes issued, even if they decline to participate. 5.4 All participants have the responsibility to be completely truthful with the information they share at all stages of the process. Any individual who knowingly or intentionally provides false information as part of a report or investigation under the Policy or these procedures will be subject to discipline in accordance with the procedures set forth in the Student Disciplinary Regulations in Part G of this Section 5.1 Page 36 6. Preliminary assessment by Student Support Officer 6.1 Upon receiving a complaint, the Student Support Officer must record the following details, at the earliest opportunity: 6.11 the complainant’s name and contact details; 6.12 a brief summary of the issues raised in the complaints; 6.13 the identity of any persons named in the complaint; and 6.14 the outcome or remedy sought by the complainant. 6.2 The Student

Support Officer must acknowledge receipt of the complaint within five (5) working days and notify the complainant of the relevant next steps. 6.3 Where the complaint relates to the conduct of a student, the Student Support Officer will assess the seriousness of the complaint and determine the appropriate course of action to deal with the matter. This assessment may involve, as appropriate: 6.31 convening discussions with the relevant parties; 6.32 collating and reviewing any relevant documentary material; and 6.33 determining whether the matter is appropriate for assisted resolution under paragraph 7 or referral under paragraph 8. 6.4 Each of the parties may bring a support person to any discussion. 6.5 The Student Support Officer may decide to take no further action where: 6.51 the person who made the complaint has provided insufficient detail or evidence of the issue to enable the matter to be properly assessed; 6.52 the complaint is frivolous, vexatious or malicious;

or 6.53 the complaint relates to alleged conduct that occurred more than twelve (12) months before making the complaint and no further occurrence has happened in the ensuing twelve (12) months. 6.6 Sub-paragraph 6.53 does not apply to complaints of alleged criminal conduct, including sexual assault. 6.7 At the conclusion of the preliminary assessment, the Student Support Officer must give the complainant (and, where appropriate, the respondent) a written statement of the outcome of the preliminary assessment, which includes: 6.71 reason for the outcome; and 6.72 details of any right to seek an appeal under paragraph 12. 6.8 Where reasonable, the preliminary assessment should be concluded within twenty (20) working days of lodging the complaint. 6.9 Where these timeframes are not reasonable, the Student Support Officer must advise the complainant of the reasons for the delay, and of the projected timeframe for conclusion of the preliminary assessment. Page 37 6.10

Subject to paragraph 6.11, where a complaint about a student alleges conduct that might, if proven: 6.101 constitute misconduct; 6.102 involve possible criminal behaviour; or 6.103 involve risk to others; then the Student Support Officer must refer to the complaint to the SDG for handling in accordance with the Student Disciplinary Regulations under Part G of this Section 5.1; and, if appropriate, to the Legal Office of the University for consideration as to whether the matter should be referred to the police. 6.11 The Student Support Officer may decide not to refer a complaint of sexual assault or sexual harassment to the SDG for handling in accordance with the Student Disciplinary Regulations if the complainant objects to the referral. 6.12 Where a complaint relates to the conduct of a faculty, staff member or affiliate, the Student Support Officer must consult with, and refer the complaint to the University’s Human Resource Department. The Student Support Officer shall advise

the complainant of the referral 6.13 Where appropriate, the Student Support Officer will refer complainant, respondent(s), and witness(es) to available services for support, including C-three. 7. Assisted resolution 7.1 Where the assessment in paragraph 6.33 determines that assisted resolution is appropriate, resolution may include, but is not limited to: 7.11 clarifying a misunderstanding; 7.12 an apology; 7.13 facilitated discussion, including mediation or conciliation; 7.14 an agreed plan of action to avoid further incidents; and 7.15 implementing awareness-raising or educational sessions about behaviour. Assisted resolutions do not result in findings related to responsibility or in sanctions. 7.2 Where reasonable, the assisted resolution process should be completed within twenty (20) working days of the assessment referred to in paragraph 6. 7.3 Where twenty (20) working days is not reasonable, the Student Support Officer must advise the complainant of the

reasons for the delay, and of the projected timeframe for resolution. 8. When assisted resolution is not successful or appropriate 8.1 Where assisted resolution is unsuccessful or considered inappropriate, the Student Support Officer must determine whether: 8.11 the matter should be referred to the SDG for handling in accordance with the Student Disciplinary Regulations; and/or 8.12 the matter should be referred to the Legal Department of the University for consideration as to whether the matter should be referred to the police; and/or Page 38 8.13 the matter should be investigated under paragraph 9; or 8.14 any other further action should be taken. 8.2 Where reasonable, the determination should be made within twenty (20) working days of the assessment referred to in paragraph 7 or from the date that the Student Support Officer declares that the assisted resolution has been unsuccessful. 8.3 Where these timeframes are not reasonable, the Student Support Officer must

advise the complainant of the reasons for the delay, and of the projected timeframe for conclusion of the determination. 8.4 Subject to sub-paragraph 8.5, circumstances in which a determination to take no further action may be made include where: 8.41 the person who made the complaint has provided insufficient detail or evidence of the issue to enable the matter to be properly investigated; 8.42 the complaint is frivolous, vexatious or malicious; 8.43 the complaint relates to alleged conduct that occurred more than twelve (12) months before making the complaint and no further occurrence has happened in the ensuing twelve (12) months. 8.5 Sub-paragraph 8.4 does not apply to complaints of criminal conduct including sexual assault 8.6 The Student Support Officer must write to the person who made the complaint (and, where appropriate, the respondent), setting out the reasons for the determination. 9. Investigation 9.1 The University may initiate an investigation: 9.11 for

serious complaints (as determined by the University in its absolute discretion, taking into account the complainant’s views and circumstances); 9.12 where assisted resolution is unsuccessful or not appropriate; or 9.13 in other circumstances, where the University considers it to be appropriate. 9.2 Except where otherwise required by University rules, protocols, policies and procedures, investigators may determine their own procedures. 9.3 Investigators will provide respondents with: 9.31 the allegations in sufficient detail to ensure that they have a reasonable opportunity to respond; and 9.32 a reasonable period of time within which to respond to the allegations. 9.3 Investigators must make findings of fact and may make recommendations for resolving complaints, in accordance with the University’s rules, protocols, policies and procedures. These recommendations may include a recommendation that the complainant be referred to the SDG for handling in accordance with the

Student Disciplinary Regulations. 9.4 A complainant is free to withdraw the complaint at any time by contacting the Student Support Officer in writing. The Student Support Officer will determine whether to close the case or conclude the investigation without the complainant’s continued participation. Page 39 9.5 9.6 Investigators must give the University written reasons for their findings of fact and (if relevant) their recommendations. The reasons must provide enough detail for complainants and respondents to determine whether there are sufficient grounds for an appeal. Where reasonable, the investigation should be concluded within thirty (30) working days of the determination referred in sub-paragraph 8.13 9.7 Where thirty (30) working days is not reasonable, the Student Support Officer must advise the complainant of the reasons for the delay, and of the project timeframe for conclusion of the investigation. 9.8 At the conclusion of the investigation, the Student

Support Officer must decide whether the matter should be referred to the SDG for handling in accordance with the Student Disciplinary Regulations. 9.9 If the matter is referred to the SDG, the Student Support Officer must inform the complainant in writing of the referral. 9.10 If the matter is not referred to the SDG, the Student Support Officer must take into account the investigation findings and any recommendations of the investigator, and give the complainant (and, where appropriate, the respondent) a written statement of the outcome of the complaint, which includes: 9.101 reasons for the outcome; and 9.102 details of any rights to an appeal under paragraph 12 10. Referral to the SDG 10.1 If a matter that has been the subject of a preliminary assessment or investigation under these procedures is referred to the SDG for handling in accordance with Student Disciplinary Regulations: 10.11 the Student Support Officer must provide the SDG with all information gathered as part of

the assessment or investigation including any written statement or report of the person conducting the investigation or assessment; 10.12 to the extent permitted by the Student Disciplinary Regulations, the SDG may take into account and rely upon the findings of the assessment or investigation in any subsequent investigation; 10.13 the Student Support Officer will: (a) update the complainant regularly on the progress of the misconduct proceedings; and (b) inform the complainant generally of the outcome of the misconduct proceedings, on a confidential basis. 11. Vexatious complaints 11.1 If the Student Support Officer or investigator believes that a person has made a vexatious or malicious complaint: 11.11 the matter will be treated as a complaint for the purpose of this procedure; 11.12 the Student Support Officer must make an assessment in accordance with paragraph 6 of these procedures; and Page 40 11.13 these procedures will also apply to the determination of whether a

vexatious or malicious complaint has been made. 12. Appeals 12.1 Potential appellants (whether complainant or respondent) should contact the Student Support Officer for information on appeals. 12.2 Appellants may appeal on the grounds of: 12.21 a claim that a substantial deviation from published procedures unfairly and materially affected the outcome of the case; or 12.23 new evidence, not known to the appellant in the previous hearing, which could exonerate him/her. 12.3 Appeals must be lodged: 12.31 in writing with the Student Support Officer; 12.32 within fourteen (14) days of the date on which the appellant was notified of the outcome of the complaint; and 12.33 accompanied by a statement of the grounds for appeal and a summary statement of the fact(s) supporting such grounds. 12.4 In exceptional circumstances, as determined by the Director of OSAR in their absolute discretion, the Manager of the Student Support Department may accept an appeal lodged out of time. The

Director of OSAR will assess whether an appeal has been validly made under this paragraph and must notify the appellant of the outcome of this assessment. 12.5 Appeals must be considered by senior staff members. Generally, this should be a Dean or a Director-level personnel who has not otherwise been involved in the complaint and who does not have an actual or reasonably perceived conflict of interests in regard to the parties to the complaint, or the matters that are the subject of the complaint. 12.6 Except at the absolute discretion of the staff member considering the appeal: 12.61 appeals will be conducted on the basis of written material; and 12.62 an appeal shall not be a full review of the matter but shall be limited to a review of the preliminary assessment or investigation process and/or new evidence that was not reasonably available to the appellant (as the case may be). 12.7 Where reasonable, the appeal should be considered within twenty (20) working days of its

lodgement. 12.8 Where twenty (20) working days is not reasonable, the Student Support Officer will advise the appellant of the reasons for the delay, and of the projected timeframe for consideration of the appeal. 12.9 At the conclusion of the appeal, the staff member considering the appeal must provide that appellant with a written statement of the outcome of the appeal and the reasons for the outcome. Page 41 13. Record keeping 13.1 All records collected, generated or used as part of the resolution or determination of a complaint under these procedures will be stored confidentially in the University’s central records management system. 14. External assistance and advice 14.1 The University will make every reasonable effort to resolve complaints internally. 14.2 However, if a complainant alleges conduct by a person over whom the University has no jurisdiction, the University may be required to refer the person raising the complaint to an external complaints

procedure or to another agency. 15. Privacy and Sharing of Information 15.1 The University will protect the identity of persons involved in reports of sexual misconduct to the best of its ability. The University will only share personally identifiable information with persons with a need to know, in order for the University to investigate and respond or to deliver resources or support services. The University does not publish the names nor post identifiable information about persons involved in a report of sexual misconduct. However, the University cannot promise complete confidentiality or privacy in the handling of sexual misconduct reports or complaint. 15.2 All participants in an investigation of sexual misconduct will be informed that confidentiality helps enhance the integrity of the investigation, protect the privacy interests of the parties and protect the participants from statements that might be interpreted to be retaliatory or defamatory. For these reasons, the

complainant and respondent will be asked at the beginning of the investigation to keep the information related to the investigation and resolution private, to the extent consistent with applicable law. This does not prohibit either a complainant or respondent from obtaining the assistance of family members, counsellors, therapists, clergy, doctors, lawyers or other resources. Witnesses, support persons and all other individuals involved will be asked to maintain complete confidentiality, to the extent consistent with applicable law. 15.3 The University reserves the right to share information regarding the case with other appropriate parties on a need-to-know basis and in accordance with applicable law. Page 42 Part G Student Disciplinary Regulations 1. Authority for the Regulations 1.1 The Student Affairs and Support Committee (“SASC”) of the University’s Academic Board is empowered to make these Regulations to provide for the discipline of students. The SASC has

authority to: 1.11 classify the misconduct that constitute disciplinary offences; 1.12 classify the disciplinary offences that may be adjudicated by the Examinations and Awards Committee (“EAC”), Deans and Heads of Programme (HoPs) and the deposit that is required to be paid for appeals against any sanction(s) imposed for the disciplinary offence(s); 1.13 establish the procedures for disciplinary proceedings before the Student Disciplinary Group (“SDG”), a sub-committee of the SASC; and 1.14 establish the procedures governing disciplinary proceedings before the Disciplinary Appeals Board (“DAB”), a sub-committee of the Academic Board. 1.2 These disciplinary procedures are designed to allow for fact-finding and decision making in the context of an educational community, and to encourage students to accept responsibility for their own actions. The intent is to provide adequate procedural safeguards to protect the rights of the individual student and the legitimate

interests of the University. The University may, in its absolute discretion, use mediation or conciliation procedures in addition to or in place of these disciplinary procedures. 2. Definition of Misconduct 2.1 Students of the University shall conduct themselves in a manner compatible with the University’s educational mission and shall be disciplined for misconduct adversely affecting that mission, regardless of whether the alleged misconduct occurs on or off campus. The general definition of misconduct under these Regulations is improper interference, in the broadest sense, with the proper functioning or activities of the University, or of those who work or study in the University; or action which otherwise damages the University or its reputation. 2.2 Students are subject to disciplinary action for the following: 2.21 Academic dishonesty, which includes but is not limited to a violation of one or more of the following standards of academic honesty in any academic activity.

Students found engaging in these behaviours shall be presumed as having done so intentionally or knowingly: (a) cheating: using/possessing unauthorized materials, study aids or other information, including but not limited to using unapproved resources, information or assistance to complete an assignment, paper, project, quiz or examination; intentionally or knowingly collaborating on any academic work in violation of oral and/or written instructions provided by a faculty member; or submitting a paper for which the content and organisation is substantially the same as a paper previously submitted for another course, without first obtaining permission from the instructor of that course; (b) plagiarism: representing the words or ideas of another as one’s own without properly acknowledging their source. Plagiarism includes, without limitation, submitting a research paper obtained from a commercial research service, the Internet, or from another student as if it were original work;

making simple changes to borrowed materials while leaving the organisation, content or Page 43 phraseology intact; or copying material from a source, supplying proper documentation but leaving out quotation marks; 2.22 (c) fabrication: inventing, altering or falsifying any data, citation or information. Fabrication includes but is not limited to citation of a primary source which the student actually obtained from a secondary source; or invention or alteration of experimental data without appropriate documentation; (d) facilitation: helping another student violate, or attempt to violate, any standard of academic honesty, or failure to report known violations of academic honesty. Conduct that: (a) disrupts or improperly interferes with the teaching, learning, research, assessment, administrative, consultative, social or other University or Universityauthorized activities, whether on University premises or elsewhere; (b) obstructs or improperly interferes with the functions,

duties or activities of any student, faculty member, staff member or representatives of the University or any authorised visitor to the University; (c) constitutes violent, indecent, disorderly, threatening or offensive behaviour or language while engaged in any University or University-authorised activity, whether on University premises or elsewhere; (d) is likely to cause injury or impair safety during any University or Universityauthorized activity, whether on University premises or elsewhere; (e) in relation to premises provided by another institution or organisation for use by University students, constitutes a serious breach of the rules and regulations of such institution or organisation; (f) constitute acts of disturbance that threaten the rights and privacy of any member of the University, whilst on University premises or engaged in University or University-authorised activity or resident in University-owned or managed accommodation; (g) infringes copyright or other

intellectual or proprietary rights; (h) tarnishes or discredits the University or which may in any way be detrimental to or prejudice the reputation, goodwill, interest or welfare of the University; (i) involving or resulting in criminal activity or civil action. Violations of law may be regarded as misconduct under these Regulations regardless of whether or not the offence is prosecuted in a court of law; 2.23 Fraud, deceit, deception, dishonesty or any act of bad faith in relation to the University or its staff or in connection with holding any office in the University or in relation to being a student of the University or impersonation of others, within or without the University, in connection with the student’s academic attainments or financial awards, the student’s admission to the University or otherwise in connection with the University; 2.24 Unauthorised use or disclosure of confidential or proprietary information including, but not limited to: (a) information

relating to proceedings of the University; (b) personal data regarding applicants, other students, graduates, clients and staff; (c) information which is confidential or proprietary to the University, a third party and/or protected under the applicable laws governing unauthorised access to or Page 44 use, obstruction or interception of computers or the unauthorised access, disclosure or modification of data, information or material (including but not limited to the Computer Misuse Act (Chapter 50A); 2.25 Unauthorized access, use or misuse or abuse of University property, facilities, equipment or services including, but not limited to, library resources, computer equipment, computer accounts, computer software and hardware, telephones and other digital devices; 2.26 Contravention of any rules, regulations, policies, guidelines, codes of conduct or procedures as may from time to time be prescribed by the University; 2.27 Doing any act or engaging in any conduct which is

likely to pose an actual or potential threat or hazard to general public health, hygiene and sanitation, including without limitation, the breach or failure to comply with any conditions, measures or safeguards imposed or any restraint, restriction or quarantine orders issued against you in relation to the control of infectious diseases within the meaning of or pursuant to the provisions of the Infectious Disease Act (Chapter 137); 2.28 Storing or bringing upon any part of University premises any unlawful goods, chemicals, gases or any explosive, combustible or hazardous substance or material, which would pose an actual or potential threat or hazard to the general safety and public health of the students, employees or staff of the University or visitors to University premises; 2.29 Failure to attend before the medical review panel (referred to in Section 2.3) for the relevant examination and/or assessment to be conducted for purposes of allowing the President to determine if the

student is fit to continue his/her course of studies at the University; 2.210 Sexual, racial, or any other kind of harassment of any student, faculty or staff of the University; 2.211 Maliciously and without reasonable cause, laying a complaint against any student, faculty or staff of the University; 2.212 Defamation, physical or violent verbal abuse of any person; 2.213 Theft of University or private property, or causing intentional or reckless damage to University or private property; 2.214 Failure to comply with the directions of University officials, their authorized agents and police or regulatory agencies acting in the performance of their duties, including refusal or failure to appear in person, answer questions fully or produce any documents as may be required at or during the course of any disciplinary investigation or proceedings or making a false testimony; 2.215 Tampering with safety equipment or the inappropriate use or possession of safety equipment on property owned or

controlled by the University; 2.216 Violations of the conditions of a sanction imposed through University disciplinary procedures, subject to any right of appeal under these Regulations; 2.3 Where a student is deemed to be in a state of mind or health which is perceived to pose a threat, affect the welfare of staff and/or students, or is disruptive to the learning and teaching process, the University reserves the right to refer the student for a health assessment before any recommencement of study can be considered. Page 45 3. Disciplinary Sanctions 3.1 The decision of a hearing body, including an appellate body, in all circumstances, shall be discretionary, shall include what entry shall be made on the record of the student and may include any one or more of the following sanctions: 3.11 Warning. Notice to the student, orally or in writing, that continuation or repetition of the conduct found wrongful, or participation in similar conduct, within a period of time stated in

the warning, shall be a cause for disciplinary action; 3.12 Censure. Written reprimand for violation of specified regulation, including the possibility of more severe disciplinary sanction in the event of conviction for the violation of a University regulation within a period of time stated in the letter of reprimand; 3.13 Disciplinary probation. Exclusion from participation in privileges and rights or extracurricular University activities (other than the right to follow courses of instruction or attend examinations) as set forth in the disciplinary probation for a specified period of time; 3.14 Restitution. Reimbursement for damage to or misappropriation of property. Reimbursement may take the form of appropriate service to repair or otherwise compensate for damages; 3.15 Monetary fine. For any offence, the imposition of a fine not exceeding Singapore Dollars Ten Thousand (S$10,000); 3.16 Withdrawal and/or Suspension. Exclusion from classes, examinations and/or participation

in any school/curriculum-related activities as set forth in the notice of suspension for a definite period of time; 3.17 Expulsion. Termination of student status for an indefinite period The conditions for readmission shall be at the sole and absolute discretion of the University 3.18 Revocation of admission and/or degree. Admission to or a degree, diploma, certificate or other academic distinction awarded from the University may be revoked for fraud, misrepresentation or other violations of institutional standards in obtaining the degree, or for other serious violations committed by a student prior to graduation; 3.2 A student who has been suspended or expelled, including having been expelled from the examination venue, and who is found “not guilty” shall be allowed full opportunity to make up whatever work was missed due to the suspension or expulsion. 3.3 No record of the disciplinary proceedings will be entered in the student’s file unless a final disciplinary

sanction is found to be warranted. 3.4 Any of the disciplinary sanctions provided for herein may be exercised notwithstanding that the person who is liable to be the subject of disciplinary proceedings (the “person concerned”) has ceased to be a student at the time the disciplinary proceedings are instituted or at the time the disciplinary matters are adjudicated either in the first instance or on appeal, provided that the circumstances giving rise to the disciplinary proceedings arose while the person was a student of the University or in connection with the person’s admission to the University. 3.5 Any of the disciplinary sanctions provided for herein may be exercised without prejudice to the right to exercise any other disciplinary powers or any other powers contained in any other rules, regulations, policies, guidelines, codes of conduct or procedures as may from time to time be prescribed by the University. Page 46 4. Disciplinary Procedures 4.1 Initiation of

disciplinary proceedings 4.11 Disciplinary proceedings against a student may be initiated upon complaint made to the student’s HoP, Dean, Directors or Heads of learning centres of the University (collectively, “Centre Heads”) that oversee the curriculum-related activities of the student or upon the independent initiative of the HoP and/or Dean of the School in which a student is enrolled or the Centre Heads or in the case of suspected examination misconduct, by the presiding examiner or chief invigilator of the examination in question. Disciplinary offences other than examination misconduct or sexual misconduct 4.12 Any member of the faculty, administration or staff or any student of the University may initiate disciplinary proceedings by filing a complaint against any student for a disciplinary offence with the student’s HoP and/or Dean or the Centre Head. 4.13 Upon receipt of the complaint, the HoP or Centre Head shall, in the first instance, investigate the complaint

against the student and ensure the student is given: 4.14 (a) reasonable notice of the alleged offence(s); and (b) a reasonable opportunity to raise any matters which the student wishes to rely on in his/her defence and/or mitigation. The HoP or Centre Head shall give due consideration to the available evidence in adjudicating the complaint. Upon being satisfied that a student has committed a disciplinary offence, the HoP or Centre Head shall notify the student: (a) of the offence; (b) of the sanction(s) imposed; (c) that the student may, within a stipulated time limit, appeal to the Dean of the corresponding School; and (d) that the Dean of the relevant School may vary the sanctions imposed in the first instance. 4.15 Notwithstanding that the HoP or Centre Head is satisfied that a student has committed a disciplinary offence, where the sanction to be imposed is beyond that which the HoP or Centre Head and/or Dean is entitled to exercise pursuant to paragraph 4.21, the

HoP or Centre Head and/or Dean shall refer the complaint to the SDG. 4.16 A student may appeal to the Dean of his/her School against any sanction(s) for a disciplinary offence, imposed by his/her HoP or a Centre Head. The notice of appeal must be given to the Dean within fourteen (14) days of the student being notified of the sanction(s) imposed. 4.17 Subject to any decision on appeal made by the Dean of the relevant School pursuant to these Regulations, the decision made by the HoP or Centre Head pursuant to these Regulations shall be final and binding on the student. Appeal to the Dean 4.18 Within fourteen (14) days of the student being notified of the sanction(s) imposed by the HoP or Centre Head, a student may appeal to the Dean of the corresponding School by giving notice in writing to the HoP or Centre Head whose decision is being appealed against and the Dean of the relevant School. Page 47 4.19 In response to an appeal, the Dean of the relevant School shall ensure

that the student is given a reasonable opportunity to address the Dean on any relevant matters which the student wishes to rely on in his/her appeal. 4.110 The Dean shall give due consideration to the available evidence in adjudicating the appeal. 4.111 Where the Dean decides to allow the student’s appeal, the Dean may vary or vacate any sanction(s) imposed in the first instance in any manner that the Dean deems fit. 4.112 Where the Dean decides to dismiss the student’s appeal, the Dean shall affirm the sanction(s) imposed in the first instance unless the Dean is of the view that the sanction(s) imposed in the first instance would be manifestly inadequate in all the circumstances of the case, in which case the Dean may impose such other sanction(s) in substitution in accordance with paragraph 4.21 as the Dean thinks ought to have been imposed or refer the complaint to the SDG for disciplinary action pursuant to paragraph 4.4 4.113 Any decision made by the Dean of a School pursuant

to these Regulations shall be final and binding on the student. Disciplinary offences involving examination misconduct 4.114 If a student is suspected of examination misconduct pursuant to paragraph 315 of Section 5.2, the presiding examiner or the chief invigilator at the examination in question shall refer the matter to the EAC. The EAC shall adjudicate the disciplinary matter, adjourn and otherwise regulate its meetings in accordance with the following procedures, rules, policies, guidelines, codes of conduct, or any other procedures as may from time to time be prescribed by the University: (a) the EAC shall convene an oral hearing within such reasonable time as it deems reasonable in the circumstances and notify the student in writing of the date and time for the oral hearing; (b) the student shall have the right to attend and make submissions and the EAC may at any time request the attendance of such persons as the EAC deems appropriate at any oral hearing; (c) if the

student or any other person(s) requested by the EAC to attend an oral hearing fail(s) to appear at the oral hearing, the EAC may, upon proof of service of the notice of the hearing, proceed to hear and determine the proceedings in his/her/their absence; (d) all hearings shall be closed and the rules of evidence (which apply to legal proceedings instituted in a court of law) do not apply to the conduct of any disciplinary hearing by the EAC. The EAC may attach such weight as it thinks appropriate to any information or material produced to it, notwithstanding that such material may not be admissible in civil or criminal proceedings; (e) the EAC hearing will be recorded manually or by a recording device. Any taped or stenographic records made shall become the property of the University; (f) the EAC will find the student guilty of examination misconduct if, on the evidence before it, it is satisfied on the balance of probabilities of his/her guilt. If the members of the EAC cannot

agree, the verdict of the EAC will be that of the majority of its members. In the event of tie, the Chair of the EAC shall have a casting vote; and Page 48 (g) the chair of the EAC shall deliver to the Registrar the EAC’s report of the final decision and sanctions imposed on the student. The Registrar shall notify the student accordingly in writing (the “Registrar’s Notice”). 4.115 Subject to any decision on appeal made by the SDG pursuant to these Regulations, the decision made by the EAC shall be final and binding on the student. 4.116 The Student may, by giving notice in writing to the Registrar within seven (7) days of the Registrar’s Notice appeal to the SDG. Only students who have attended and participated in their examination misconduct hearing by the EAC have the right to appeal. 4.2 Disciplinary action by Deans, Heads, Centre Heads and the EAC 4.21 In respect of disciplinary offences, the HoPs, Centre Heads and Deans shall be entitled to exercise one or

more of the disciplinary powers set out in paragraphs 3.11 to 316 of these Regulations, provided that the HoPs, Centre Heads and Deans shall not have powers to: (a) impose any fine; (b) withdraw or suspend any academic privileges, benefits, rights or facilities for more than one month; or (c) withdraw or suspend any non-academic University privileges, benefits, rights or facilities for more than one semester. 4.22 HoPs, Centre Heads and Deans are empowered to deal with disciplinary offences only in relation to persons who are students at the time the allegations of offences are adjudicated. All other offences shall be dealt with by the SDG as set out in paragraph 4.4 4.23 In respect of disciplinary offences involving examination misconduct, the EAC shall be entitled to exercise the disciplinary powers set out in paragraphs 3.16 and 317 of these Regulations as it may consider appropriate given the circumstances. Page 49 4.3 Interim summary action 4.31 4.32

Notwithstanding any other provisions of these Regulations, the Provost may, by giving notice in writing to a person who is a student at the time of the notice, summarily suspend or withhold any privilege, benefit, right, or facility or take any other summary action as the Provost may think fit against such student, if the Provost has reason to believe that such action is necessary to: (a) protect the interests of the University or any employee or student of the University; or (b) ensure the proper functioning of the University. Without affecting the generality of the paragraph 4.31, in respect of sexual misconduct report against a person who is a student at the time of the report, the Provost may, as an interim measure: (a) suspend a student from entering specified parts of the University’s premises; (b) restrict a student’s access to particular classes; (c) restrict a student’s access to specified University’s buildings, facilities or accommodation; or (d) prohibit

a student from speaking to or approaching another person (including by social media, email, letter or through a third party) for such period, and on such terms, as the Provost considers necessary. 4.4 4.33 Any summary action taken by the Provost pursuant to paragraphs 4.31 and 432 of these Regulations shall be an interim measure and the Provost shall refer the matter to the SDG within one (1) month after the notice of summary action is given to the student. The SDG shall thereafter deal with the disciplinary matter in accordance with the procedures set out in paragraph 4.4, and the summary action that was taken against the student shall automatically lapse once the SASC chairperson has issued his decision and implemented the sanction(s). 4.34 Notwithstanding paragraph 4.33, the Provost shall have the discretion to withdraw any summary action taken and/or to refrain from referring the matter to the SDG where the Provost has reason to believe: (a) the summary action is no longer

necessary to protect the interests of the University or any employee or student of the University, or to ensure the proper functioning of the University; and (b) the student has willingly submitted to counselling or other rehabilitative programmes, and such counselling and rehabilitative programmes has appreciable prospects of reforming the student. Disciplinary action by the Student Disciplinary Group 4.41 The SDG is empowered to deal with all circumstances calling for disciplinary action, and exercise any of the disciplinary powers set out in paragraphs 3.1 of these Regulations. 4.42 Where a disciplinary matter or an appeal against the decision of the EAC or a complaint alleging sexual misconduct from the Student Support Officer is referred to the SDG, the SDG shall meet to adjudicate the disciplinary matter or consider an appeal, adjourn and otherwise regulate its meetings in accordance with the following procedures, rules, Page 50 policies, guidelines, codes of conduct,

or any other procedures as may from time to time be prescribed by the University: (a) if the Chair(s) of the SDG is of the opinion that grounds exist for the exercise of disciplinary action against a person, notice will be given thereof (the “Notice”) to the person concerned providing: (i) an explanation of the charges that have been made; (ii) a summary of the information gathered; (iii) a reasonable opportunity for the student to reflect upon and respond on his/her own behalf to the charges; and (iv) an explanation of the applicable disciplinary procedures. (b) upon receipt by the person concerned of the Notice, the person concerned may, within such period as may be specified in the Notice, make submissions and provide documentary evidence to the SDG in respect of the matter(s) specified in the Notice; (c) the SDG may at any time request the production of such documents as the SDG deems appropriate for the purposes of any paper or oral hearing; (d) at any paper or

oral hearing, legal counsel of the University may attend for the purpose of giving legal advice to the SDG; (e) in the case of a paper hearing, the SDG shall adjudicate the disciplinary matter on the basis of the Notice, any submissions or documentary evidence provided and any other documents which may be required by the SDG to be produced; (f) in the case of an oral hearing, the SDG shall fix a date and time for the oral hearing and provide the person concerned at least fourteen (14) days’ notice of the hearing save and except if the hearing relates to an examination misconduct, the oral hearing shall be fixed within such reasonable time as the University deems reasonable in the circumstances; (g) at any oral hearing, the person concerned shall have the right to attend and make submissions. The person concerned may be accompanied by legal counsel provided that due notice is given to the SDG by the person concerned at least seven (7) working days before the hearing date and

giving the legal counsel’s qualifications and other details that the SDG may require. The SDG has the discretion not to accede to or grant the request if any relevant details required by the SDG to be furnished by the person concerned are not furnished to its reasonable satisfaction; (h) in the case of an oral hearing, the SDG may at any time request the attendance of such persons as the SDG deems appropriate, and the SDG may question such persons and the person concerned, and may give permission for the person concerned to question such persons if the SDG is of the view that doing so would be appropriate for the fair adjudication of the matter; (i) if the person concerned or any other person(s) requested by the SDG to attend an oral hearing fail(s) to appear at the oral hearing, the SDG may, upon proof of service of the notice of the hearing, proceed to hear and determine the proceedings in his/her absence; (j) rules of evidence (which apply to legal proceedings instituted in

a court of law) Page 51 do not apply to the conduct of any disciplinary hearing by SDG. The SDG may attach such weight as it thinks appropriate to any information or material produced to it, notwithstanding that such material may not be admissible in civil or criminal proceedings; (k) the SDG shall, on the basis of the Notice, any further submissions or documentary evidence which may be provided by the person concerned, any other documents which may be requested to be produced by the SDG and any evidence as may be given by any persons who may be requested to attend an oral hearing by the SDG, adjudicate the matter(s) specified in the Notice and exercise the powers set out in paragraph 3.1 of these Regulations as it may consider appropriate given the circumstances. The deliberations and decisions of anyone previously considering the matter shall be irrelevant for the SDG’s purposes; (l) a member of the SDG shall disqualify himself or herself if he or she feels that, in reaching

a decision as to whether or not the person concerned has committed an act of misconduct, he or she cannot on the weight of the evidence do so without bias or prejudice. If a student member of the SDG disqualifies himself or herself, the OSAR shall appoint a replacement. If a faculty member of the SDG disqualifies himself or herself, a replacement must be selected from the faculty of the School of the disqualified SDG member by the Dean of the School. If the Director, OSAR, being the Chairperson of the SDG, disqualifies himself or herself, the Registrar shall select a person of similar administrative rank to replace him or her. (m) the SDG will find the person concerned guilty of misconduct if, on the evidence before it, it is satisfied on the balance of probabilities of his/her guilt. If the members of the SDG cannot agree, the verdict of the SDG will be that of the majority of its members. In the event of a tie, the Chair of the SDG shall have a casting vote; (n) if two or more

students are involved in related misconduct, the SDG may, at its discretion, deal with their cases together but shall make separate findings for each person concerned; (o) all hearings shall be closed. Rules of common courtesy and decency shall be observed; (p) The SDG hearing will be recorded manually or by a recording device. Any taped or stenographic records made will become the property of the University; (q) the secretary of the SDG shall prepare a summary report of the hearing, including the recommendation of the SDG. The summary report of a SDG hearing shall be reviewed by the SDG members who shall indicate their approval in writing. (r) the chair of the SDG shall present the summary report of the SDG to the SASC chairperson. If the SDG finds that an act of misconduct has occurred, the chair of the SDG shall deliver to the SASC chairperson the record of the hearing, and specify any sanctions to be imposed on the person concerned. The SASC chairperson shall make a

decision after considering the findings and recommendations of the SDG, inform the person concerned of his decision and implement the sanction(s). 4.43 Subject to any decision on appeal made by the DAB pursuant to these Regulations, any decision made by the SDG shall be final and binding on the person concerned. 4.44 As an appellate body for matters involving examination misconduct, the SDG may refuse to entertain any appeal it deems to be frivolous or without merit. Page 52 4.5 Disciplinary Appeals Board 4.51 The DAB shall be the final appellate body in respect of any decision made by the Provost in accordance with paragraph 4.3 of these Regulations and any decision made by the SDG. The DAB shall be entitled to exercise any of the disciplinary powers set out in paragraph 3.1 of these Regulations 4.52 A person concerned may, by giving notice in writing to the Registrar within 14 days of any decision of the SDG and upon payment of a deposit stipulated by these Regulations,

appeal to the DAB. Only students who have attended and participated in their student conduct hearing by the SDG have the right to appeal. A notice of appeal must contain, at a minimum, a statement of the grounds for appeal and a summary statement of the fact supporting such grounds. Grounds for appeal include: (a) a claim that a substantial deviation from published procedures unfairly and materially affected the outcome of the case; (b) a claim that the sanction(s) imposed was(were) inappropriate or overly harsh (however, sanctions of reprimand and disciplinary probation are not subject to appeal, except in cases involving restitution, fines or academic dishonesty); (c) a claim that a hearing officer abused his/her discretion; (d) new evidence, not known to the person concerned in a previous hearing, which could exonerate him/her. 4.53 The fee that must be paid for an appeal to the DAB shall be S$321 (inclusive of GST). If the DAB subsequently vacates or reduces any of the

sanction(s) imposed in the first instance, the fee shall be refunded to the person concerned. 4.54 The DAB shall consider an appeal, adjourn and otherwise regulate its meetings in accordance with the following procedures, rules, policies, guidelines, codes of conduct, or procedures as may from time to time be prescribed by the University: (a) an appeal hearing shall not be a full review of the matter. The DAB shall consider no new evidence unless such evidence was not reasonably available to the person concerned or the Provost or the SDG (as the case may be) at any time prior to the decision by the Provost or the hearing before the SDG (as the case may be); (b) the DAB shall consider the appeal as a paper hearing unless in the opinion of the DAB, it is appropriate for the appeal to be considered by way of an oral hearing or unless the person concerned requests that the appeal be considered by way of an oral hearing; (c) at any paper or oral hearing, legal counsel of the

University may attend for the purpose of giving legal advice to the DAB; (d) in the case of an oral hearing, the DAB shall fix a date and time for the oral hearing and provide the person concerned at least fourteen (14) days’ notice of the hearing; (e) at any oral hearing, the person concerned, the Provost, or any member of the SDG (as the case may be) shall have the right to attend and, subject to the restriction on the introduction of evidence referred to above, make submissions concerning the grounds upon which the appeal is based. The person concerned may be accompanied by legal counsel at any oral hearing provided that due notice is given to the DAB by the person concerned at least seven (7) working days before the hearing date giving the legal counsel’s qualifications and other details that the DAB may require; Page 53 (f) the DAB may at any time request the attendance of such persons as the DAB deems appropriate at any oral hearing; (g) if the person concerned or

any other person(s) requested by the DAB to attend an oral hearing fail(s) to appear at the oral hearing, he/she shall be deemed to have abandoned his/her request for an appeal, unless the person concerned can demonstrate that an extraordinary circumstance prevented his/her appearance; (h) rules of evidence (which apply to legal proceedings instituted in a court of law) do not apply to the conduct of any appeal hearing. The DAB may attach such weight as it thinks appropriate to any material presented before it, notwithstanding that such material may not be admissible in civil or criminal proceedings. The DAB has the discretion not to accede to or grant the request of the person concerned if any relevant details required by the DAB to be furnished by the person concerned are not furnished to its reasonable satisfaction; (i) at any paper or oral hearing, the DAB shall, on the basis of any evidence presented to it pursuant to paragraph 4.54(a) above, and such submissions as may be

given by any persons requested to attend an oral hearing by the DAB pursuant to paragraph 4.54(f) above (if any), consider the appeal and exercise any of the powers set out in paragraph 3.1 of these Regulations as it may consider appropriate under the circumstances; (j) the DAB may uphold the summary action decided by the Provost or the SDG’s decision that the person concerned was guilty of misconduct if, on the evidence before it, it is satisfied on the balance of probabilities, agreement with the Provost’s summary action or the SDG’s decision of his/her guilt. If the members of the DAB cannot agree, the verdict of the DAB will be that of the majority of its members; (k) a member of the DAB shall disqualify himself or herself if he or she feels that, in reaching a decision as to whether or not the person concerned has committed an act of misconduct, he or she cannot on the weight of the evidence do so without bias or prejudice. If a student member of the DAB disqualifies

himself or herself, the DAB chairperson shall appoint a replacement. If a faculty member of the DAB disqualifies himself or herself, a replacement must be selected from the faculty of the School of the disqualified DAB member by the DAB chairperson. (l) all hearings shall be closed. Rules of common courtesy and decency shall be observed; (m) the DAB hearing will be recorded manually or by a recording device and will be transcribed in whole or in part on request of the person concerned. The cost of such transcript will be paid by the person concerned unless waived by the DAB. Any taped or stenographic records made will become the property of the University; (n) the secretary of the DAB shall prepare a summary report of the hearing, including the decision of the DAB. The summary report of a DAB hearing shall be reviewed by the DAB members who shall indicate their approval in writing; (o) the DAB shall announce its decision to the Registrar dismissing or allowing the appeal,

confirming, varying or revoking any decision made or sanctions imposed on the person concerned by the Provost or the SDG (as the case may be) or specifying such additional sanctions on the person concerned as the DAB shall consider appropriate. The Registrar shall inform the person concerned and implement the sanctions. Page 54 4.6 4.7 4.55 The DAB may refuse to entertain any appeal it deems to be frivolous or without merit. 4.56 Pending the outcome of any appeal to the DAB, the decision being appealed against shall remain in force and be valid and binding upon the person concerned. For the avoidance of doubt, an appeal to the DAB shall not operate as a stay of the decision appealed against. 4.57 The decision of the DAB shall be conclusive and binding on the person concerned. Criminal offences 4.61 The fact that criminal investigations are ongoing or criminal proceedings have been instituted against a student in respect of any conduct shall not preclude the University from

instituting and/or continuing disciplinary proceedings against him/her provided such proceedings are necessary in the interests of the University. The SDG or DAB may nevertheless decide on the special facts of any particular case to adjourn further consideration of the disciplinary proceedings until criminal proceedings have been completed or a decision not to prosecute has been taken. 4.62 The University has the right to report any criminal offence to the police. However, if a person claims to be the victim of an offence committed by a student, but does not wish the police to be involved, the University may, at its discretion, agree not to report the matter to the police; 4.63 Where a finding of misconduct has been made under these Regulations, and a student has also been sentenced by a criminal court on the same facts, the penalty imposed by the criminal court may be taken into account in deciding the penalty under these Regulations. Liability of the University The University,

its officers, or any other person or entity associated with them shall have no liability whatsoever for any loss, damage, claim, legal costs or other expenses that a person concerned may suffer or incur, whether directly or indirectly (including any loss of profit or any damage to reputation) by reason of any disciplinary proceedings instituted or summary action or disciplinary action taken pursuant to these Regulations and the publication or notification of any information relating thereto. Page 55 Part H Student Fees Regulations 1. Payment of fees All fees and other dues are payable on demand and must be paid in the manner and by the dates prescribed. The University will inform the student of the amount payable 2. Changes to fees The University may vary or amend fees, deposits and other dues without prior notice. 3. Refund of fees The University does not refund or waive course fees, other fees or any part of them. 4. Students in debt 4.1 Failure to pay fees. Failure to

pay fees by the specified date and in the prescribed manner may result in the cancellation of your course reservation, course registration, or any weekend school place allocated for that course. You will no longer be entitled to attend classes, obtain any course materials or any award. . 4.2 Continued provision of services. If the University continues to provide services to you even though you have failed to pay your fees in time, or if the University delays in exercising any of its rights or powers, this does not in any way constitute a waiver by the University of any of its legal rights and remedies including the right to bring an action against you for non-payment of fees. 4.3 Applying payment. The University reserves the right, at its discretion, to apply payments to your longest outstanding debts. 5. Awards Until the appropriate course fees and all other dues have been paid, you will not be awarded a course credit or certificate. Without prejudice to legal or other remedies

available to it, the University reserves the right to refuse your further registration if you are in debt to the University. No awards will be conferred upon, and no academic transcripts or references will be issued. 6. Sponsorship Notwithstanding that a sponsor has undertaken to pay any fees on your behalf, you remain liable to the University for all outstanding balances. Page 56 5.2 ACADEMIC RULES AND REGULATIONS Part A Assessment and Examination Regulations Your course result is the aggregate of two assessment components – continuous assessment (OCAS) and examinable (OES) component. The determination of each course result goes through many levels of review and discussion. The EAC approves the course results 1. Continuous assessments 1.1 Forms of assessment. Continuous assessment may be in the form of tutor-marked assignments (“TMAs”) or quizzes. These continuous assessments guide students in the learning process and enable the University to assess the standard of

understanding that students have attained. Depending on the course, it could take the form of computer-marked assignments, e.g on-line quiz, laboratory report, term paper, etc Students must submit assignments by the respective deadlines specified in the relevant course calendar. All changes in deadlines will be notified via Canvas. You are advised to familiarise yourself with the assessment strategy of each course, which can be found in Canvas (Course Information) or Study Guide or Course Synopsis in the Curriculum Plan. 1.2 Continuous assessment scores. Each continuous assessment is weighted to reflect its relative importance. Your OCAS is the aggregate of all individual assignment weights multiplied by the respective scores you obtained for that assignment. A zero score is awarded for the assignment that you do not submit. Unless otherwise stated, you must attain the minimum OCAS to pass a course (see Section 2, paragraph 2.13) Your scores will be recorded and made known to you.

Unless otherwise stated in the course calendar, the minimum OCAS mark to pass is 40 1.3 Plagiarism. Plagiarism occurs when you submit the work of another person as original work and/or paraphrasing or directly quoting material from a source without appropriate or adequate acknowledgement. “Plagiarism” takes many forms and includes: 1.31 self-plagiarism – e.g submitting a marked assignment or part of a marked assignment that had been previously submitted to satisfy the requirements for another course or for the same course, without first obtaining permission from the instructor of the course in which the student is currently registered; 1.32 using a choice phrase or sentence that you have come across and failing to differentiate clearly between your words and the language of your source(s); 1.33 providing incomplete or inadequate footnotes or references; 1.34 using text downloaded from the Internet, borrowing statistics or assembled fact from another person or source,

and/or copying or downloading figures, photographs, pictures or diagrams without acknowledging sources without adequately or appropriately acknowledging sources; 1.35 Copying from the notes or essays of a fellow student, or working on an assignment with another person when asked to hand in individual work; 1.36 failing to note areas of agreement between your work and that of other writers; and/or 1.37 putting together ideas from various sources without putting them into the context of your work and/or without offering original work. Plagiarism may inadvertently occur due to inexperience. To avoid this, read carefully all coursespecific study advisory, especially on statements concerning plagiarism and know how to draw references on your sources. Seek your instructor’s advice on this early All TMAs and other Page 57 forms of coursework (e.g ECAs and project reports) will be submitted to Turn-It-In, a webbased plagiarism detection system, before they are marked The TMA

set-up in Canvas has been integrated with Turn-It-In to identify plagiarised text in TMAs and coursework submitted by students. Collusion/plagiarism is a form of cheating and is not acceptable in any form in a student’s work, including examination. Students who committed collusion/plagiarism must pass the “Academic Integrity” module before they can continue with their programme. 1.4 Sanctions for plagiarism. If plagiarism is established, the following penalties may be imposed by the University: University Policy for Undergraduate Programmes First Offence Second Offence i) Warning letter; with or without ii) Reduction of grade for assignment penalised iii) Complete and pass (minimum score of 80%) SD103 Academic Integrity i) Zero score for assignment penalised ii) No refund of course fees English Proficiency Programme i) Warning letter; with First Offence ii) Re-submission of assignment within 3 calendar days iii) Complete and pass (minimum score of 80%) SD103

Academic Integrity iii) Complete and pass (minimum score of 80%) SD103 Academic Integrity Third Offence i) Zero marks (i.e “F grade”) for the course ii) No refund of course fees iii) Complete and pass (minimum score of 80%) SD103 Academic Integrity Fourth Offence i) Expulsion from the programme ii) No refund of programme fees iii) Complete and pass (minimum score of 80%) SD103 Academic Integrity should the student intend to study again at the University Note: In cases where a student has committed more than one count of plagiarism, each case should be treated as a separate offence, no matter how close these cases are separated in time to each other. The cumulative number of plagiarism offences committed by the student shall be taken into consideration when deciding on the penalties to be meted out as detailed in paragraph 1.4 above The cumulative number of plagiarism offences is based on the aggregated count during the student’s course of study in the University at

any point in time from the very first time that he or she is enrolled in the University’s course(s) or programme (e.g re-admission, restart of programme, transfer of programme, CET registration, progression from Undergraduate to Master degree. 1.5 Appeal Against Outcome of Case. A student may write in to Student Support Department to appeal against the outcome of his/her case within seven (7) calendar days from the date indicated on the letter informing him/her of the University’s decision. 1.6 Confidentiality of information in TMAs submitted. All confidential information that may be contained in a TMA, including without limitation, information relating to or in connection with the student’s employer (“Confidential Information”), will be held by the University and the instructor in strict confidence. All Confidential Information will be used by the University and the instructor only for purposes of assessing the TMA and for teaching the course. It is the student’s

responsibility to obtain his/her employer’s consent in writing for the use and publication of the Confidential Information in the TMA. Page 58 1.7 Processing personal data. Students are not expected to process personal data as part of their studies, but if required to do so, they must obtain the agreement of their instructor or supervisor that the processing is necessary and notify the University. 1.8 Submission of TMAs. 1.81 All TMAs must be submitted electronically through Canvas. No partial submission of TMA will be accepted unless otherwise specified. Please refer to the Canvas Student Guide under the section on TMA Submissions for details. Canvas Student Guide is located under the FAQs menu item of the Student Portal. 1.82 A mark deduction scheme applies to late submission of TMAs. Unless otherwise advised, the deadline for a TMA submission shall be the day before the classes for the course in a particular week.8 1.83 There will be a 12-hour grace period meant

solely for addressing any technical issues. After the grace period, for each 24-hour block thereafter that a submission is late, 10% of the total possible mark will be automatically deducted via the grade-book system in Canvas. Since assignments are marked out of a total of 100 marks, 10 marks will be deducted for every 24 hours that the submission is late. TMAs that have more than 50 marks deducted will be assigned zero mark. Please click here for some examples If you would like to appeal against your marks deducted, you would need to submit an online Application for Mark Deduction Appeal via e-services in the Student Portal together with a non-refundable administrative fee of S$64.20 (inclusive of GST) for each course that you are appealing. For group-based assignments, all team members must sign on the relevant supporting documents. You can only appeal for TMA mark deduction under the following circumstance(s) that occur before or on the day of the submission deadline. (a) (b) (c)

(d) Hospitalisation due to major illness of the student; Death of student’s immediate family members (i.e Spouse/siblings/children/parent/parent-in-law/grandparent/grandparent-in-law); Care to student’s children due to hospitalisation; Pregnancy related medical conditions. The grounds for rejection of TMA marks deduction appeal are commonly: i) ii) iii) iv) Work-related travel; National Service (NS) In-Camp Training (ICT); Death of relatives other than those mentioned in 1.83 (b); Hospitalisation of immediate family members (except for children, refer to point 1.83 (c) 1.9 Grading and return of TMAs. Marked TMAs will be returned to you via Canvas with your instructor’s comments. You can view your assignment result from Canvas under the Grades menu item of your course. For more information on receiving your TMA results, please refer to Canvas Student Guide. If your TMA is not returned to you after 3 weeks, you should ask your instructor about it. If your instructor does not

respond to your query within the next three days, you should inform your School. 1.10 Review of TMA scores. 1.101 First stage – to appeal against the score awarded for a TMA or to clarify the comments made by your instructor, you must return the marked TMA to the instructor within 7 days of the date that the instructor returned the marked TMA to you. This must be Page 59 accompanied with a letter, directed to the instructor who marked your TMA, stating the grounds on which you are appealing against the assessment. 1.102 Second stage – If you are not satisfied with the response from your instructor, you must forward the marked TMA, together with the related correspondence, and any other relevant information, to the University’s Examination Administration (“EA”) Department, within 4 days of your receipt of your instructor’s decision, to appeal against the TMA grade. An appeal may not result in an increase to your original score Scores may remain unchanged and it is

even possible for them to be lower. You would have to accept the result of your appeal, even in the case of the latter. Decision made at the second stage shall be final and the University will not accept subsequent appeals. 1.103 A non-refundable administrative fee of S$6420 (inclusive of GST) is payable for each second stage appeal. You may print a copy of the Assignment Grade Review Form found in the Forms section of the Student Portal. Submit the duly completed form to the University together with the relevant documents and payment. For group-based assignments, all team members must sign on the Assignment Grade Review Form. 1.104 For English Proficiency (EP) Programme), a maximum of two stages of appeals will be allowed for the written essays and/or assignments in any of the SDE courses (SDE101 to SDE105). Stage 1 To appeal against the score awarded for an essay in any of the SDE courses (SDE101 to SDE105), or to clarify the comments made by the marker, you must: (a) Return the

marked essay to the Faculty-in-charge of EP Programme (via tlc@suss.edusg) within 7 calendar days of the date that the marked essay is returned. (b) The marked essay must be accompanied with a letter, stating the grounds of appeal against the assessment. The Faculty-in-charge will review the appeal with a decision. An appeal may not result in an increase to the original score Scores may remain unchanged, and it is even possible for them to be lower. Stage 2 If you are not satisfied with the decision from the Faculty-in-charge of the EP Programme, you must: (a) Forward the marked essay, together with the related correspondence, and any other relevant information, to the Director of the Teaching & Learning Centre (via tlc@suss.edusg), within 4 calendar days of the date of receiving the Faculty-incharge’s decision, to appeal against the essay grade (b) An appeal may not result in an increase to the original score. Scores may remain unchanged, and it is even possible for them

to be lower. You would have to accept the result of the appeal, even in the case of the latter. The decision made at the second stage shall be final, and the University will not accept subsequent appeals. 1.11 Re-submitting TMA. You cannot re-submit a TMA after the submission deadline (including the grace period). 1.12 Non-submission of TMAs. A zero score will be awarded for any TMA not submitted Page 60 2. Examinable score component 2.1 Form of OES component. The examinable component may take the form of a written examination, dissertation, project presentation, ECA, report, and/or other form as specified by the course. The relevant course materials will give provide specific instructions on the academic contents of your examinable work. 2.2 Submitting your ECA. 2.21 ECA is to be submitted electronically through Canvas. A student who has submitted his/her ECA will not be allowed to withdraw from the course. Please refer to the Canvas Student Guide for details. 2.22

Electronic transmission may be delayed as network traffic can be extremely heavy especially near the ECA submission deadline. Connections/accessibility to Canvas cannot be guaranteed. As such, you are strongly advised to submit your work well ahead of the cut-off time. Marks will be deducted for late submission, refer to section 2, paragraph 2.4 2.3 Submitting your capstone/applied project. Please refer to your course materials for specific instructions on the requirements of your capstone/applied project. The Capstone/Applied Project Handbook will be uploaded onto Canvas under “Course Information” before the commencement of each semester. The “In-Progress” status is automatically assigned to any student who fails to submit the Final Report. In addition to an administrative late fee of S$58850 (inclusive of GST), five (5) marks will be deducted from the final Rank Score for non-submission of Final Report. Any student with an In-Progress status and fails to submit the Final

Report again by the stipulated deadline in the following semester will be deemed to have failed the Capstone Project course. The student would have to re-register for the Capstone/Applied Project again and pay the full fees. 2.4 Late submission of ECA electronically. The University’s policy on Mark Deduction for Late Submission applies. Please refer to Section 52, Paragraph 183 for more information 3. Examination arrangements 3.1 Entitlement for examination. You are entitled to take the examinations for courses that you have successfully registered to read, to re-sit and/or to repeat in that semester. 3.2 Provisional examination dates. 3.21 examinations are normally held in May (for the January semester) and in November (for the July semester). The duration for written papers is typically 2 to 3 hours Examination sessions can be held in the morning, afternoon or evening, on weekdays, and if necessary on Saturdays or even Sundays; 3.22 if you plan to take a vacation or go

away overseas during the examination period, you are strongly advised not to confirm your travel arrangements until you have the detailed examination timetable with you. The University is not obliged to set up a special examination session due to your absence or vacation; 3.23 the examination timetable for the next semester will be released during the eCR exercise held in the current semester. The eCR exercise typically takes place 3 months before the commencement of the next semester. Page 61 3.3 Examination venue allocation. 3.31 you will receive your examination timetable and the examination centre allocation via the Student Portal in April (for the January semester) and in October (for the July semester). 3.32 you MUST produce a satisfactory proof of your photo identity such as your identity card, passport or driving licence when you enter the examination venue. You will not be allowed to sit for the examination without satisfactory proof of your identity, 3.33 it is

your responsibility to ensure that you attend the right session in the right venue; 3.34 you should be at the examination venue at least 30 minutes before the start of the examination. You are strongly advised to factor in time allowance for heavy traffic, adverse weather conditions and parking problems when planning your journey to the examination venue; 3.35 you will typically be allowed into the examination venue about 10 – 15 minutes before the examination begins. This gives you time to find your desk, to settle down and to read the instructions on the front covers of your answer booklet and question paper. 3.4 Late arrival. If you arrive within 30 minutes after the start of the examination, you will be admitted to the examination. No extra time will be given for late arrival You will not be allowed to take the examination if you arrive more than 30 minutes after the examination has begun. 3.5 Overseas examination centre 3.51 you may apply to take your examination at an

overseas centre if you are living abroad while pursuing your studies with the University. The University will endeavour to arrange a suitable organisation to conduct the examination on behalf of the University corresponding to the timing of the main examination in Singapore. However, such arrangements may not always be possible and the University does not guarantee that there will be an overseas examination for you. 3.52 to request for an examination to be held overseas, please submit an online Application for Overseas Examination through the Student Portal before the end of March (for January semester) and end of September (for July semester). The University will not entertain late requests as identifying a suitable organisation/venue, coordinating the logistics and finalising the entire examination arrangements require time. 3.53 You are required to make a fresh application for each examination period. There is a fee of S$535.00 (inclusive of GST) per course payable for an

examination to be held overseas. In the event that the University is unable to arrange for an overseas examination, this fee shall be refunded to you. 3.6 Seating arrangements. The seating plan will be displayed outside the examination room Seats are arranged by course code and by students surnames in alphabetical order. 3.7 Invigilation. 3.71 in each examination venue, there will be a Presiding Examiner, Chief Invigilator and Invigilators responsible for the conduct of the examinations; 3.72 the Presiding Examiner will inform students about the examination, including announcements concerning the use of materials, the start time and end time of the examination; Page 62 3.73 3.8 3.9 under all circumstances, invigilators will not help you to interpret questions, misprints or ambiguities. If you discover an error, a misprint or an ambiguity in the paper, please notify the invigilator, who will in turn inform the Presiding Examiner/Chief Invigilator accordingly. Question

paper and answer booklets 3.81 you are not permitted to read the Examination Question Paper (EQP) until you are told to do so. You should check the front cover of the EQP to ensure that you have been given the correct EQP. You should read the instructions on the EQP cover page carefully. You should attempt the total number of questions required by the paper Do not answer more questions than required. 3.82 an examination label detailing your seat number, personal identifier (PI) and course code will be placed on your table for you to paste on your answer booklet. Please check to ensure that your PI number and course code are clearly written/available on all answer booklets submitted. The invigilator will supply you, upon request, additional answer booklets during the examination if you need them. Rough paper will not be provided as all rough work must be written in the answer booklet and crossed out accordingly; 3.83 you are required to submit legible hand-written answers. The

University reserves the right not to mark any examination scripts that are illegible, or to charge the students concerned for transcription; 3.84 all essay plans and rough work should be done in your answer booklet. Work that is crossed out in your answer booklet will not be marked. As any work not crossed out is considered to be part of your answer, it will be marked, even if it is meant to be your rough work or essay plan. You will not be given marks for the same information twice, even if it appears in your plan and in your answer. 3.85 examinations where you are permitted to submit electronically are subject to their own rules will be subject to a variation of the above rules. You must comply with those rules if you are taking such examinations. Permitted materials at examinations. The rules on what materials/instruments may be brought into the examination venue will be given in the Examination Rules and Regulations Booklet. This booklet will be made available in the Student

Portal together with the release of your personalised examination timetable two weeks before the start of the examinations. 3.91 3.92 Open book examination. Students are allowed to bring any materials into the examination venue. Electronic devices, apart from approved calculators and Chinese e-dictionaries are not allowed. Closed book examination. Students are not allowed to bring any materials, apart from approved calculators into the examination venue. Please note that for some closed book examinations, calculators are not allowed. Any printed or text-based materials that are required by the student to answer the questions will be provided in the examination venue. In addition, you can only bring along your writing and erasing stationery, like your pen, pencils, ruler, eraser, correction tape and a valid form of identification document with photograph like your Identity Card, Student Card, Driving License, Passport, etc. into the examination venue. 3.93 You are strongly

encouraged NOT to: (a) bring your calculator casing to the exam venue (b) consume food during examination 3.94 Calculators. All types of calculators, including programmable calculators, are allowed Page 63 for SUSS examinations. Calculators in mobile phones, smart watches, PDAs, etc however, are not permitted as these are primarily communication devices. 3.95 Use of electronic devices (a) (b) General Rules for e-Examinations (i) Prior to sitting for the examination, students must download and register the Examplify application software (the “Application”) on the electronic device which they will be using during the examination (“Electronic Devices”). This device must be on the list of Electronic Devices that are capable of supporting the Application (“Permitted Devices”). Students who do not possess a Permitted Device will not be allowed to take the examination. (ii) The University will issue specific guidelines from time to time on the list of Permitted

Devices. This list, together with technical information and usage guidelines on the Application may be found at http://Issupport.sussedusg Students are advised to refer to the resource link (under the e-Exam category) regularly for updates. Students are advised to resolve any technical issues prior to the examination as no extra time will be given during the examination to resolve any technical issues or a student’s unfamiliarity with the Application. (iii) Students may only bring in one (1) Permitted Device (i.e laptop) to their examination desks. (iv) Students may not use their Permitted Device to access the internet or communicate with anyone for any reason during the examination. (v) It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that the Permitted Device brought into the examination venue is in good working condition; that its battery is fully charged and able to work for the duration of the examination. Open Book e-Examinations Prior to sitting for an open book

e-examination, students may download onto their Permitted Device any information and materials, including etextbook, which the students deem to be relevant and/or useful for access during the examination (“Electronic Reference Materials”). In addition to Electronic Reference Materials, students may also bring hard copy reference materials to their examination desks. Students are to access the Application on their Permitted Device to type their answers to the examination questions and submit them electronically. (c) Closed Book e-Examinations For a closed book e-examination, students may only access the Application on their Permitted Device to type their answers to the examination questions and submit them electronically. (d) Open Book Written Examinations with e-Textbook (i) For an Open Book Written Examination with e-Textbook, students are permitted to bring only one (1) laptop or tablet or smart phone (“Permitted Device”) to their examination desks. Students who do not

possess a Permitted Device or who do not bring their own Permitted Device to the examination venue will not be able to access the relevant e-Textbook Page 64 during the examination. Please note that the University will not be providing any Permitted Device to students at the examination venue. 3.96 3.10 (ii) The University will issue specific guidelines from time to time on the list of Permitted Devices that may be used for Open Book Written Examination with e-Textbook. This list, together with technical information and usage guidelines may be found at http://lssupport.sussedusg Students are advised to refer to the resource link under “Open Book Written Exam (eTextbook)” regularly for updates. Students are advised to resolve any technical issues prior to the examination as no extra time will be given during the examination to resolve any technical issues or a student’s unfamiliarity with his/her Permitted Device. (iii) Prior to sitting for the Open Book Written

Examination with e-Textbook, students may download onto their Permitted Device the e-Textbook and any Electronic Reference Materials which the students deem to be relevant and/or useful for access during the examination. In addition to Electronic Reference Materials, students may also bring hard copy reference materials to their examination desks. (iv) The Permitted Device must be set to the “airplane mode” in the examination venue and students shall not use their Permitted Devices to access the internet or communicate with anyone for any reason during the examination. Clear Pencil Case. You may bring your writing and erasing stationery and place them in a clear pencil case for your examination. A clear ziplock bag or equivalent may also be brought in to hold your stationery. Please note that the invigilators will ask you to put away or surrender your pencil case if it is not clear. Special circumstances. 3.101 if you have a physical disability or serious illness, which

requires extra time or other support facilities during an examination, please inform the Examination Administration Department with your supporting document(s) at least 21 days before the examination. An administrative fee of S$117.70 (inclusive of GST) per course is payable for the local off-site examination arrangement and an indemnity form has to be signed by the students. For off-site examination at home, there must be a family member or friend present to accompany the student. Otherwise, the examination will be conducted under the supervision of two (2) University invigilators and the additional administrative charge will be $235.40 (inclusive of GST) per course; 3.102 if you wish the University to be aware of a special circumstance giving rise to serious difficulty, which occurred within 21 days before the submission cut-off date of an examinable work or your written examination, you should complete and submit form E39, with supporting documentary evidence, to the University no

later than 3 working days after the submission cut-off date or your written examination. Form E39 can be downloaded from the Student Portal. The EAC will not consider information received later than 3 working days after the examination or submission cut-off date. EAC will not review cases not supported by relevant evidence/documents. You must also keep proof of posting; and 3.103 special circumstances may include death or critical illness of a dependant or immediate family member (evidence such as a medical certificate or death certificate is required) but does not include home relocation, work pressure, normal pregnancy or that English is your second language. Page 65 3.104 under exceptional circumstances, if you are unable for medical reasons to sit the examination, you may be eligible for an award of aegrotat (an examination pass) under a code of practice approved by the EAC. Such awards are likely to be limited to students who, for medical reasons, are unable to continue with

any further study and are registered on the final course or courses which would qualify them for certain academic awards. 3.11 Re-sit examinations and re-submissions. Not all courses permit students to re-sit a written paper or re-submit the examinable component. If re-sit examination or re-submission is available for your course, you have only one attempt to do so in the next presenting semester. You are not permitted to re-sit an examination or to re-submit for a course passed. You cannot ask for a re-submission or re-sit examination to be given to you. 3.111 Re-sit examinations: If you withdraw from the course eg by not turning up for the final examination (i.e W status), you may re-sit the examination or re-submit during the next examination period for the course, provided you have: (a) attained an OCAS of at least 40 marks; and (b) fulfilled all the mandatory requirements, if any, e.g compulsory laboratory sessions 3.112 If you have taken the written examination but failed

(ie an F grade), you may re-sit the written examination during the next examination period for the course, provided you have: (a) achieved an OES of at least 15 marks; (b) achieved an OCAS of at least 40 marks; and (c) fulfilled all the mandatory requirements of the course, if any, e.g compulsory laboratory sessions. If any of the above requirements is not met, the outcome will be a repeat (not a re-sit), unless your course has a different set of governing rules to re-sit the examination, as specified in your course information. 3.12 Re-submitting examinable work. 3.121 if your course does not have written examination as part of the examinable components, and you are eligible for a re-sit, you must re-submit the examinable work as required by the course; and 3.122 if your course’s examinable component requires a written examination and another piece of work, regardless of whether you fail both or either one of the two, and you are eligible for a re-sit, you must take the

written examination and fulfil the other piece of examinable work in order to complete the re-sit. 3.13 Leaving the examination venue. 3.131 once you have entered the examination venue, you are not permitted to leave before the commencement of the examination, during the first 30 minutes and the last 15 minutes of the examination. You cannot withdraw from the course once you are in examination venue notwithstanding that you fell ill during the examination or you left the examination venue without completing the examination; 3.132 after the first 30 minutes of the start of an examination session, you are allowed by the invigilator to leave the examination venue, under a reasonable degree of supervision, Page 66 for a short period to visit the lavatory. Your question paper, answer booklet(s) and all other materials/instruments must remain at your seat; 3.133 If you fall ill during the examination, notify an invigilator immediately If you are unable to continue with the paper, you

may leave the examination venue only after the first 30 minutes of the examination session. Once you are out of the examination venue, you will not be allowed to return to the examination venue again until the examination session is over. If you wish to notify the EAC about your illness, you must complete Form E39, enclose it with a medical certificate clearly stating that you were “unfit for examination” by a qualified, recognised medical practitioner, and then send it to the University not later than 3 working days after the examination. 3.134 if you complete your examination before its scheduled end time, you will be allowed to leave the examination room (provided it is not during the first 30 minutes or the last 15 minutes of the examination session). Please put up your hand to alert the invigilators who will escort you to the front of the hall/room to sign out and hand in all your answer booklet(s) and examination stationery to the invigilator. You will not be re-admitted once

you left the examination venue. 3.135 If there is another run of the same examination (one hour later) due to contingency plan, no student is allowed to leave the examination venues (in the first examination run) until after one hour and 30 minutes into the examination. 3.14 Submitting your answer booklet(s) 3.141 on completion of the examination, you must ensure that all your answer booklets bear your PI number and course code. All your answer booklets must be fastened using the strings provided, in accordance with the instructions on the answer books and/or question paper. Some examinations may require you to write answers on the question paper or on separate answer sheets provided. Under such circumstances, you must fasten the question paper or answer sheets with your answer booklets for submission 3.142 you must remain seated until the Presiding Examiner gives permission to all students to leave the examination venue. Other than the question paper and materials/instruments which

you brought in to the examination venue, you are not permitted to remove any examination materials whether used or unused, out of the examination venue. You must ensure the invigilator has collected your answer booklet(s). If you inadvertently take any answer book out of the examination venue, it will not be marked. 3.143 For e-examination, students will be guided to submit answers online and nonsubmission will not be graded 3.15 Misconduct during an examination. The following constitute misconduct during an examination: 3.151 possession of a mobile phone (except for Open Written Examination with eTextbook), smart watch or any kind of communication/electronic devices at your desk; 3.152 taking into or having in possession, while in the examination venue, any unauthorised materials (including blank pieces of paper) other than those issued by an invigilator for closed book examination; 3.153 aiding or attempting to aid another student, or obtaining or attempting to obtain aid from

another person; 3.154 consulting, or attempting to consult, any persons or materials during moments of being away from the seat while the examination is in progress; Page 67 3.155 communicating with another student in the course of the examination; 3.156 writing on the Examination Answer Booklet before given instructions to do so; 3.157 writing on the Examination Question Paper (for the case of examinations where Examination Question Paper forms part of the Examination Answer Booklet) before given instructions to do so; 3.158 attempting to influence script marker(s) and/or any University officials; 3.159 behaving in a manner deemed by the University to be inappropriate in an examination venue or that might prejudice the reputation, goodwill, interest or welfare of the University; 3.1510 having writings on any part of your body The Presiding Examiner/Chief Invigilator is authorised to stop a student suspected for committing any of the above from continuing with the examination;

confiscate the unauthorised materials, ask the student to write his/her statement and expel the student from the examination venue. The student will be subject to the University’s disciplinary process set out in paragraph 4.114 of the Student Disciplinary Regulations Note: It is the University’s policy to not return any or all of the confiscated materials. 3.16 Anonymity of examination scripts. All examination scripts presented for marking are anonymous. You must not write your name on any answer booklet(s) The University reserves the right not to mark your script if it bears your name on it. This rule does not apply to most projects, dissertations or other kinds of examinable works, which have different marking arrangements from the written examinations. 3.17 Lost property. The University is not liable for the use, misuse, damage or loss, of any personal item/property brought into or left at an examination venue. 3.18 Smoking. Smoking is strictly prohibited in the

examination venue 3.19 Mobile phone. If your mobile phone rings (in your bag) during the examination, our invigilator will bring your bag to the front of the examination venue for the Chief Invigilator to switch off your mobile phone (with the invigilator as witness). The bag will remain at the front of the examination venue until the end of the examination for you to claim it. 4. Award of grades 4.1 Students will be awarded grades as follows: Level All Letter Grade Marking Scheme A+ A AB+ B BC+ C 85 – 100 marks 80 – 84 marks 75 – 79 marks 70 – 74 marks 65 – 69 marks 60 – 64 marks 55 – 59 marks 50 – 54 marks Page 68 Grade Point Value (GPV) 5.0 5.0 4.5 4.0 3.5 3.0 2.5 2.0 Level Letter Grade Marking Scheme D+ D F 4.2 Students taking ETB and OEL coded courses will be awarded grades as follows:    4.3 45 – 49 marks 40 – 44 marks < 40 marks Grade Point Value (GPV) 1.5 1.0 0 Pass with Distinction Pass Fail Full-time students taking

compulsory non-academic requirements will be awarded grades as follows:     Pass with Distinction Pass Fail Exempted These non-letter grades do not contribute to your CGPA, and the numerical values that they represent are indicated in the following table: Level All Non-Letter Grade Marking Scheme Pass with Distinction Pass Fail > 75 marks 40 – 74 marks < 40 marks Page 69 Part B Graduation Regulations 1. Grade Point Average (“GPA”) system (Not applicable to General Studies programme) 1.1 GPA system. The University uses a 5-point GPA system to track a student’s progress at programme level over the duration of study. 1.2 Cumulative Grade Point Average (“CGPA”). This is the academic performance indicator used in tracking students’ progress throughout their candidature of study with the University. CGPA represents the grade point average of all graded courses taken in the University by a student. 1.3 Definition of an active semester. It is

defined as a semester in which a student is enrolled for at least one new or a re-sit or a repeat course. If a student withdraws from a course or several courses in one/several active semester(s), the CGPA computation will exclude all the withdrawn courses. Students’ CGPA will be printed on their course result notification letter and transcript 1.4 Performance reviews. The University’s academic progression policy applies to all students enrolled in the University after January 2006. Please see Section 19 for details of the policy 1.5 Credit recognition for restart and replacement programmes. Students may transfer up to a maximum of 60cu + 10cu of U/C/SUSS Core courses, where applicable from their previous completed courses to their restart or replacement programme. Such transfer will be subject to the following conditions: 1.51 the courses taken previously match the CP of the restart or replacement programme, and 1.52 the CGPA of these courses is at least 2.0 Please see

Section 1.9 for more details 1.6 Notations without Grade Points. The following notations will also be used in the academic records. They have no assigned grade point and thus will not be counted in the calculation of CGPA. W : P : : IP : granted Withdrawal Passed applicable for Project/Capstone courses which are in progress applicable only for Project/Capstone Courses where an extension (IP) is 1.7 CEX Waiver and Credit Recognition. Courses that are exempted and courses that are recognised will not be counted in the calculation of CGPA. However, they will be counted towards the cu requirement for graduation, and reflected in the transcript as total cu of credit recognition awarded. 1.8 Transfer of Credits for TOP. Courses with approval to transfer credits will be counted in the calculation of CGPA. 1.9 Fail Grade. A Fail (F) grade obtained in a course and a new grade attained for any subsequent resit/repeat will be counted in the calculation of CGPA. The grades for all courses

taken in the University will be reflected in the transcript. Page 70 2. Computation of Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) SUM (course cu x course GPA) / (total cu of all graded courses). Illustration 1 (with no withdrawal grade): Course Course 1 Course 2 Course 3 CGPA = = = Number of cu 10 cu 5 cu 3 cu Grade A F D Grade Point 5 0 1 [10 (5) +5 (0) + 3 (1)] / [10 + 5 + 3] 53 / 18 2.94 Illustration 2 (with withdrawal grade): Course Course 1 Course 2 Course 3 Course 4 CGPA = = = Number of cu 10 cu 5 cu 5 cu 3 cu Grade A W* F D Grade Point 5 0 1 [10 (5) +5 (0) + 3 (1)] / [10 + 5 + 3] 53 / 18 2.94 * The “W” withdrawal grade has no impact on the CGPA. 3. University Awards for Full-Time Students 3.1 Honours Degree. Students will be eligible to graduate if they have completed 200 cu of study, which must include an Applied Project Course. In addition, students must attain at least a CGPA of 3.0 after the completion of the required 200 cu of courses in order to graduate

with an honours classification (see paragraph 5 below). If a student successfully completes 200 cu of courses, but attains a CGPA between 2.0 to 299, the student can only graduate with a Pass Degree. A student who has completed 200 cu of courses including 10 cu C/SUSS Core courses and achieved a CGPA of at least 2.0 cannot register to read additional courses for the purpose of improving his/her attained CGPA. 3.2 Students must also fulfil all the following requirements for graduation: 3.21 Student Team Building; 3.22 Service-Learning (for students matriculated in 2014-2017) or Community Engagement (for students matriculated in 2018 and after); 3.23 Overseas Experience; 3.24 at least 24 weeks of Work Attachment; and 3.25 E-Portfolio. 4. University Awards for Part Time Students 4.1 For students enrolled before 2007 Page 71 Basic Degree. Students must complete 120 cu of courses and achieve a CGPA of at least 20 at the point of graduation. A student who has completed

120 cu of courses and achieved a CGPA of at least 2.0 cannot register to read additional courses for the purpose of improving his/her attained CGPA. Honours Degree. Students will be eligible to graduate if they have completed 160 cu of study, which must include a Capstone Course. In addition, students must attain at least a CGPA of 3.0 after the completion of the required 160 cu of courses in order to graduate with an honours classification (see paragraph 5 below). If a student successfully completes 160 cu of courses, but attains a CGPA between 2.0 to 299, the student can only graduate with a Basic Degree A student who has completed 170 cu of courses including 10 cu UCore courses and achieved a CGPA of at least 2.0 cannot register to read additional courses for the purpose of improving his/her attained CGPA. 4.2 For students enrolled from January 2007onwards Basic Degree. Students must complete 130 cu of courses including 10 cu UCore courses and achieve a CGPA of at least 2.0 at the

point of graduation A student who has completed 130 cu of courses including 10 cu UCore courses and achieved a CGPA of at least 2.0 cannot register to read additional courses for the purpose of improving his/her attained CGPA. Honours Degree. Students will be eligible to graduate if they have completed 170 cu of study, which must include a Capstone Course and 10 cu UCore courses. In addition, students must attain a CGPA of at least 3.0 after the completion of the required 170 cu of courses in order to graduate with an honours classification (see paragraph 5 below). If a student successfully completes 170 cu of courses, but attains a CGPA between 2.0 to 299, the student can only graduate with a Pass Degree. A student who has completed 170 cu of courses including 10 cu UCore courses and achieved a CGPA of at least 2.0 cannot register to read additional courses for the purpose of improving his/her attained CGPA. Level 3 courses. All students must complete at least 30 cu of Level 3 courses

as part of the graduation requirements (See Section 1.35) 5. Classification of Degrees 5.1 Honours Degree Classification. The table below depicts the Honours Classification System for the University’s awards for candidates whose graduation criteria is based on the GPA system, i.e, those enrolled from January 2006 onwards Class of Honours CGPA First Class* 4.50 – 500 Second Upper 4.00 – 449 Second Lower 3.50 – 399 Third Class 3.00 – 349 Pass 2.00 – 299 Fail Below 2.00 Remarks All courses (i.e courses at all levels) are counted in honours classification Student will not graduate * A student must achieve at least an A- in the designated Capstone project. 5.2 Basic Degree Classification#. The table below depicts the Basic Degree Classification System for the University’s awards for candidates whose graduation criteria is based on the GPA system, i.e, those enrolled from January 2006 onwards Page 72 Class of Award # CGPA Pass with Merit 3.20 –

500 Pass Fail 2.00 – 319 Below 2.00 Remarks Applicable for July 2012 graduating cohort onwards Student will not graduate Not applicable to General Studies programme 5.3 Eligibility. Students who successfully complete and fulfil the graduation criteria for a basic degree will be awarded a basic degree for their programme of study. For Basic with Honours programme, the University will offer those students who are eligible to read honours to undertake the honours phase of the programme. Upon successful completion of the Basic with Honours programme, the students will graduate with two degrees (i.e basic and honours) at the end of the compounded study period. 6. Notification of results 6.1 Release of results. The University will release your course results online via the Student Portal, approximately one month after the end of the examination period. To safeguard confidentiality, results will not be released by telephone. 6.2 University policy. It is not the University’s

policy to return examination scripts to students nor allow students to view their scripts. The University does not furnish any information about the examination performance, including the examination score. 6.3 Pending status. Occasionally, the Examinations and Awards Committee may need more time to reach a decision about your course result. In such an exceptional case, a pending status will be given. 7. Examination Grade Appeal 7.1 Process. If you would like to appeal on your grade(s) after the release of course results, you will need to submit an online Examination Grade Appeal Application via e-services in the Student Portal) together with a non-refundable administrative fee of S$64.20 (inclusive of GST) for each course for which you are appealing. You must state the circumstances and the rationale for a grade appeal. It is the students responsibility to ensure that the University receives all his/her supporting documents and the fee payable by the given deadline. No late

submissions will be entertained. The University does not entertain queries pertaining to course results via telephone. 7.2 Outcome of Examination Grade Appeal. All reviews will be carried out promptly Please click After the review, a student’s course results here to view the Review Process. could be upgraded, remain unchanged or even adjusted downwards. The Universitys decision on the appeal is final. 8. Convocation / Graduation 8.1 Invitation to ceremony. Students who have successfully met all requirements of their degree or diploma programmes will be invited to attend the convocation ceremony organised by the University. Attendance at the ceremony is not mandatory 8.2 Ceremony information. Information on the convocation ceremony including academic dress rental will be available on the University’s website prior to the ceremony. Page 73 8.3 Graduate directory. Only the names of graduates that have been officially registered with the University will be printed in the

official Directory of Graduates for the convocation ceremony. This directory is produced annually to coincide with the ceremony and is a public document. Its contents are not confidential. Page 74 APPENDIX HONOUR CODE The University is committed to uphold and maintain high standards of academic, social and moral conduct in the learning process and achievement of its students. As such, it adopts an Honour Code which sets out the academic, social and ethical standards that it expects of its students. All students have to abide by the Honour Code, uphold its spirit and undertake the following: (1) To comply with all rules, regulations, codes of conduct, procedures and guidelines or other terms and conditions as may be prescribed by the University from time to time in connection with their admission to and study in the University; (2) To uphold and maintain absolute academic honesty and integrity in examinations, tests, projects, assignments, tutorials and any required academic

deliverables (collectively known as “Academic Work”) required to be undertaken by students during the course of their study at the University. This duty extends beyond their own behaviour to include the responsibility to uphold standards in the University community and report any dishonest acts that include but are not limited to fabricating, colluding, plagiarising, cheating, giving or receiving any unauthorised aid in the delivery of Academic Work, or engaging in any act that may compromise the integrity of the academic standards of the University; (3) To maintain the highest standards of personal integrity and respect the rule of law, social order, and the rights of others as are expected of all members of the University, both within and outside the University; (4) Not to conduct in a manner which may be regarded by the University as being in violation or breach of the Honour Code, or as misbehaviour or conduct unbefitting of a student member of the University. Misbehaviour

includes acts that may result in threats, harm, disadvantages to others, compromising the rights of others and bringing disrepute to the University and/or its students, staff and faculty. Misbehaviour also refers, without limitation, to physical violence and assault, verbal or mental abuse, harassment, false allegation, false declaration, slander, libel or defamation committed against any fellow student, staff and faculty; and (5) To be held fully accountable, responsible and liable for their own actions and deeds, and to accept responsibility for consequences which may arise from violation or breach of the Honour Code, including without limitation, disciplinary action, investigation, interview by panel of enquiry, hearing, issuance of warning, suspension, restriction of rights and privileges, imposition of sanctions, disqualification, delay in graduation, expulsion or any other appropriate action or steps that may be taken by the University. Page 75